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Pinterest has confirmed an AllThingsD report that it has raised a $225-million Series E round of funding led by Fidelity Investments, with previous investors including Andreessen Horowitz, FirstMark Capital, Valiant Capital and Bessemer Venture Partners chipping in as well. The investment comes at a $3.8-billion valuation, and the total amount of money raised by Pinterest is now around — brace yourself — $538 million. Pinterest recently started to experiment with ads, or promoted pins, as the company calls them – but so far it isn’t charging brands any money for these experiments.

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In Brief

Aereo finally released its Android app Tuesday, which subscribers of the TV streaming service can now download from Google Play. Aereo is currently just available in a handful of cities, but has said that it wants to be in 22 markets by the end of the year. The service still faces opposition from broadcasters, which recently asked the Supreme Court to take up their case after losing repeatedly in lower courts. Aereo had initially promised the release of its Android app for September, and is now calling the release a “public beta.”

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In Brief

Mote.io, the Chrome extension that turns your phone into a remote for your web browser, just added support for the Plex media center app, TuneIn’s radio streaming service and Google’s Play Music service. All of these extensions were built by third-party developers, thanks to Mote.io’s API. Check out our previous story about Mote.io here.

In Brief

Vizio launched a new, lower-priced version of its CoStar streaming player Wednesday. The new player, dubbed CoStar LT, will sell for $80, and offer access to apps like Netflix, Hulu Plus and YouTube, as well as second-screen control capabilities similar to Google’s Chromecast. The original CoStar, which Vizio continues to sell for $100, is based on Google TV, but its new sibling uses Opera’s SDK instead. Both devices combine live TV viewing with apps, but Vizio CTO Matt McRae recently told me that consumers are starting to watch more streaming content than traditional TV.

In Brief

Premium movie channel Epix will premiere its documentary Schooled: The Price of College Sports online this Wednesday, giving people without an Epix subscription access to the movie through a live stream at 5pm PT. The movie, which is all about the money in collegial sports, was produced exclusively by Epix. Making it available online could be good promotion for the network, but it’s also an interesting response to piracy and cord cutting. Epix CEO Mark Greenberg told me in a recent interview that the TV industry has to innovate to win over cord cutters:

“Some in the media business call this cord cutting. But three decades ago, we had a different name for this in the industry. We called it competition.”

On The Web

Canada’s cable TV subscribers could soon have the ability to subscribe to just the channels they actually watch: Canada’s Industry Minister James Moore recently said on a local TV show that his government is going to require pay TV providers to unbundle their offerings and offer TV channels a la carte, according to Reuters. Any such move would likely be watched closely by both cable companies and consumers in the U.S., where TV executives have long said that unbundling would actually make TV more expensive for consumers.

On The Web

Just in time for the weekend comes an interesting cocktail party factoid, courtesy of the fine folks over at the Radio and Internet Newsletter (RAIN): 20 percent of Spotify’s catalog, or about four million songs, haven’t been played a single time. RAIN writer Brad Hill got the number from a recent Spotify infographic, which obviously put a slightly more positive spin on it, but he also had an interesting suggestion for shrinking this online music nirvana: gamify music discovery, and reward folks who play a song for the first time.

In Brief

Hulu’s new CEO may come from Fox, whose parent company News Corp. owns about a third of the video service. Both Reuters and Bloomberg reported Thursday night that Hulu will name Mike Hopkins, who is currently heading distribution for Fox Networks, as its new CEO soon. Hulu is currently being led by interim CEO Andy Forssell, who stepped in when founding CEO Jason Kilar left the company back in March. Notable about Hopkins’ appointment would be that Fox has been a long advocate of Hulu moving more towards a subscription and TV Everywhere model, which would deemphasize the free, ad-supported side of the service.

On The Web

Brazil hasn’t been an easy market for Netflix, but the company is now taking some first steps towards the production of original content in the country. Netflix has commissioned a three-part mini series called A Toca, which stars local web video stars and will only be distributed to Brazilian subscribers, according to a Variety report. The company’s Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos told Variety that Netflix will produce more original fare in Brazil as soon as it has a big enough local subscriber base. Netflix also announced that it will make the Brazilian movie Apenas o Fim available to its subscribers worldwide.

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