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This week’s IETF meeting in Vancouver has ended without a decision on a mandatory video codec for WebRTC, the proposed standard for real-time voice and video communication. Browser makers, videoconferencing equipment manufacturers and chipset vendors had hoped to finally agree on whether H.264 or VP8 should become the default codec for WebRTC, and Cisco had even mounted an eleventh-hour push, getting Mozilla to agree to implement H.264 — but in the end, no consensus was reached in what I’ve been told was an at times testy meeting.

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Spotify is closing in on another $200 million in funding from Technology Crossover Ventures, a VC firm that previously backed Facebook, Netflix and Groupon, according to a report from Sky News. Spotify previously raised $288 million, and recent reports indicate that the new funding could value the company at $5.75 billion. Spotify said in March that it had 6 million paying subscribers and 24 million active users.

In Brief

Second-screen startup i.TV has bought its better-known, but not that much more popular rival GetGlue. i.TV announced the transaction Wednesday, and Variety is reporting that the deal was all stock, and “far less than the $24 million GetGlue had raised from investors.” The acquisition continues a trend of consolidation in the second-screen space that now also has network executives question the value of these kinds of apps.

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In Brief

Netflix is bringing the award-winning documentary film the Square, which chronicles the popular uprising in Egypt’s Tahrir Square, to all of its members in early 2014. The Square won audience awards at both the Sundance and Toronto film festivals. For Netflix, it’s the first of a number of documentary acquisitions as the company is looking to take original content beyond TV shows and stand-up comedy specials. Next up could be Hollywood movies, which Netflix would like to get earlier than HBO and other pay TV networks.

In Brief

There’s Valley celebrities, and then there’s real celebrities — and both don’t always get along. Case in point: Kim Kardashian is suing YouTube cofounder Chad Hurley, alleging that he illegally recorded Kanye West’s marriage proposal to her to promote his new video venture MixBit. Valleywag has the whole lawsuit, which doesn’t have a whole lot of nice tings to say about Hurley, while the Hollywood Reporter focuses on why Kim & Kanye wanted to keep their party private: to sell exclusive rights to TV.

In Brief

Don’t hold your breath for a Netflix app on your Comcast set-top box: Netflix has started to strike deals with pay TV operators abroad to run its app on their devices, and CEO Reed Hastings recently told investors that he would love to be on Comcast’s gear as well — but Comcast cable operations CEO Neil Smit said during the company’s earnings call that this is “not really a high priority” for Comcast, according to Home Media Magazine. On the same call, Comcast also announced that it lost 129,000 video subscribers in its most recent quarter, 12,000 more than during the same time period last year.

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Peter Chernin’s media company is buying a controlling interest in Crunchyroll, reports AllThingsD. The report puts the money spent at less than $100 million, noting that Crunchyroll has raised $5 million to date. Crunchyroll is specializing in the import of anime TV shows, and the company operates a growing subscription business. For more on Crunchyroll, check out my interview with the company’s CEO Kun Gao.

In Brief

Media center app maker Plex launched a feature Monday that allows users to store their videos in the cloud and then play them back on any device with a Plex app on it, including Android and iOS mobile devices. Cloud Sync, as the feature is called, was first shown off at CES, and is now available to paying PlexPass subscribers. Interestingly, Plex doesn’t offer its own storage locker, but instead hooks into Google Drive, Dropbox, Box and other cloud storage offerings, with the ability to spread your files across all of your lockers. Time to sign up for more free cloud storage accounts?

On The Web

We all love binge viewing — but not everyone loves Netflix: FX and Turner are looking to get the rights to stream entire seasons of shows, as opposed to just the last five episodes, to allow their viewers more binging. Netflix is opposed to those demands, and studios have learned to love Netfix’s cash. But which role is cable playing in all of this? Vulture has a fascinating story about one of Hollywood’s next battle lines.

In Brief

Amazon’s long-rumored Roku killer may be facing delays, forcing the company to postpone a launch until next year, according to a Verge report. The device, which is based on Android, has been in the works at Amazon for more than a year, and the company hired a bunch of Google TV developers from Logitech to work on it after that company decided to get out of the connected TV space. Amazon’s TV box is going to have third-party apps, but obviously also feature Amazon’s own services — but now we might have to wait until after the holiday season to find out how it stacks up against Roku, Apple TV and Co.

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