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Good news for everyone lining up to get an Xbox One: Microsoft’s new game console will have a YouTube app available at launch, after all. YouTube announced the app on its blog Wednesday, explaining that it will make use of both voice and gesture control, and […] Read more »

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Apple TV users just got another option to watch Antiques Roadshow: PBS launched an app on Apple’s streaming box Tuesday, promising access to “thousands of hours of your favorite PBS programming.” But don’t expect whole seasons of Downton Abbey: Amazon got an exclusive for that show, […] Read more »

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On The Web

Comcast plans to launch a digital download store for movies and TV shows by the end of the year, according to Reuters. The cable operators plans to offer videos for sale on its website as well as through its cable boxes, presumably to offer subscribers access to more fare than its existing VOD service has in stock. For the studios, this would be another way to push people towards buying digital movies – but is anyone really interested in owning a movie anymore?

In Brief

SoundCloud celebrated its fifth birthday Wednesday, and the Berlin-based startup marked the occasion by revealing an interesting usage data point: SoundCloud users now upload twelve hours of audio every minute, according to a blog post penned by the company’s CEO Alex Ljung. That’s impressive, but also shows that audio still isn’t as ubiquitous as video on the web. To compare, YouTube surpassed 13 hours of video uploads per minute a little more than two years after its launch. Nowadays, people upload more than 100 hours of video per minute to the service.

On The Web

The major pay TV operators have lost a total of 113,000 customers during their last quarter, according to new numbers from independent research firm MoffettNathanson, by the way of the Los Angeles Times. Time Warner Cable took the biggest hit, losing more than 300,000 subscribers thanks to its retransmission fight with CBS. Most of those were absorbed by DISH, DirecTV and At&T, but some decided to cut the cord entirely. It’s worth noting that Craig Moffet long questioned whether cord cutting even existed. This week, his research note said that “the pay-TV industry has reported its worst 12-month stretch ever.”

On The Web

Hulu is looking to partner with pay TV operators to offer Hulu Plus as a bundle or add-on to a pay TV subscription, reports the Wall Street Journal. Talks with operators like Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Cox are still in early stages, according to the paper, but Hulu hopes to eventually have its service included on set-top boxes and become a kind of one-stop-shop for the industry’s authenticated catch-up TV offerings.

In Brief

This week’s IETF meeting in Vancouver has ended without a decision on a mandatory video codec for WebRTC, the proposed standard for real-time voice and video communication. Browser makers, videoconferencing equipment manufacturers and chipset vendors had hoped to finally agree on whether H.264 or VP8 should become the default codec for WebRTC, and Cisco had even mounted an eleventh-hour push, getting Mozilla to agree to implement H.264 — but in the end, no consensus was reached in what I’ve been told was an at times testy meeting.

On The Web

Spotify is closing in on another $200 million in funding from Technology Crossover Ventures, a VC firm that previously backed Facebook, Netflix and Groupon, according to a report from Sky News. Spotify previously raised $288 million, and recent reports indicate that the new funding could value the company at $5.75 billion. Spotify said in March that it had 6 million paying subscribers and 24 million active users.

In Brief

Second-screen startup i.TV has bought its better-known, but not that much more popular rival GetGlue. i.TV announced the transaction Wednesday, and Variety is reporting that the deal was all stock, and “far less than the $24 million GetGlue had raised from investors.” The acquisition continues a trend of consolidation in the second-screen space that now also has network executives question the value of these kinds of apps.

In Brief

Netflix is bringing the award-winning documentary film the Square, which chronicles the popular uprising in Egypt’s Tahrir Square, to all of its members in early 2014. The Square won audience awards at both the Sundance and Toronto film festivals. For Netflix, it’s the first of a number of documentary acquisitions as the company is looking to take original content beyond TV shows and stand-up comedy specials. Next up could be Hollywood movies, which Netflix would like to get earlier than HBO and other pay TV networks.

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