Whoops!

Looks like the page you were trying to get to doesn't exist. You can try searching again or browse some of our recent stories.

Stories for Jul. 9, 2014
In Brief

Aereo isn’t ready to give up, and just revealed its plan B in a court filing: The company wants to get access to broadcast networks through compulsory licenses, arguing that now that the Supreme Court found it to be like a cable system, it wants to be treated as such (hat tip to the Hollywood Reporter.) That’s a stark contrast from Aereo’s previous stance, but it’s also a maneuver unlikely to succeed, as my colleague Jeff John Roberts recently explained.

In Brief

Two news stories from Wednesday — one about a startup trying to play data broker between user and website and another about a study into what people would charge for their personal data — offer more evidence that there’s an appetite for a market where consumers sell their data to advertisers and website. The idea isn’t new (we wrote about its traction back in 2012) and actually has merit because it puts money in consumers’ pockets and higher-quality data in advertisers’ databases. But monetizing the idea might be easier said than done: Enliken, one of the startups we covered in that 2012 piece, appears to have closed its doors.

In Brief

You may think the U.S. fell short on telecom competition, but in Mexico a single company has long dominated the communications landscape: América Móvil. It services 70 percent of all mobile connections and 80 percent of all landline phone links in the country. But billionaire Carlos Slim, the carrier’s controlling owner, is bowing to regulator pressure and is divesting substantial portions of Slim’s empire, according to Bloomberg. The sales and spin offs will reduce América Móvil’s market share in mobile and wireline to below 50 percent, as well as remove it from the communications tower and satellite TV businesses. It doesn’t look as if América Móvil’s substantial operations in Latin America or the U.S. (where it owns prepaid giant TracFone) will be affected.

In Brief

Dell launched two new Android tablets Wednesday, built around Intel’s new 64-bit Merrifield SoCs and dual-core Atom processor. Although the current version of Android is 32-bit, these tablets should be able to take advantage when Android L, with 64-bit support, is released to the public. The 7-inch Venue model, with a 1280 x 800 resolution screen, costs $150. The Venue 8,which sports a full 1920 x 1200 display, can be had for as little as $180. At those prices, you’re getting a pretty good value — just don’t confuse them with Dell’s impressive Venue 8 Pro, which runs Windows.