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BuzzFeed has come under fire for deleting thousands of old articles, which founder Jonah Peretti says didn’t live up to the kinds of standards the site wants to adhere to now. Should the company be criticized for doing this because it’s a journalistic no-no, or congratulated for evolving? Read more »

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In Brief

The YouTube app on your television may be getting a makeover: Google has updated the interface for its YouTube App for TV to reduce the number of clicks needed to get around menus armed only with a remote control. The update has already rolled out to Microsoft’s Xbox One, and will head to other streaming devices “in the following weeks.” The new interface relocates subscriptions to channels and videos to a menu on the left hand side, like on the web, and it also puts a search bar on the top of the default home page. You can check out a preview of the interface in your browser here.

In Brief

Sportscaster ESPN is getting ready to shut down its public API. ESPN’s API team announced this week that it won’t be issuing any new API keys going forward, and that all previously issued API keys are going to be revoked in early December. The move will help the company to “better align engineering resources with the growing demand to develop core ESPN products,” the team said in a blog post. ESPN isn’t the only media company that recently decided to pull the plug on a public API: Netflix announced two months ago that it will shutter its public API in November.

In Brief

A U.K. man has been arrested for running a proxy server that granted access to “piracy” websites that had been blocked by the courts. The unnamed 20-year-old was arrested earlier this week in Nottingham, according to a Thursday statement by the City of London Police’s Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU). According to Wired, the arrested man was running Immunicity, a proxy service set up in 2013 to bypass court-ordered site blockages. As far as I’m aware, this is the first arrest in the U.K. over the circumvention of copyright-protecting measures by proxy, so it should be an interesting case to watch.

In Brief

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The Killing may have been too depressing for network TV, but thanks to Netflix, the dark and brilliant crime drama is now back for a short final season: All six episodes of season four went live on Netflix Friday. The Killing is not a newbie on Netflix: The streaming service previously collaborated with AMC on the production of season three. But with this season being a Netflix exclusive, you’ll actually get to hear some swear words, according to an interview with executive producer Veena Sud.

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