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Web firms like to say they cooperate with the authorities in the countries where they operate, but what are they to do when there’s just been a coup? In the case of Facebook and Google, asked by the new military junta in Thailand to come discuss cracking down on anti-coup online dissent, the answer seems to be “play dead.” According to a report in the Wall Street Journal on Friday, the social media companies simply didn’t show up to the meeting. If the junta was keen on following Turkey’s censorship example, incidentally, it should probably note that a Turkish court has just overturned a recent blanket YouTube ban.

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Thursday, August 28, 2014
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  1. And this surprises… “WHO?” After all, both of those companies have taken the stand on privacy as being, “whatever is yours is mine, and if my government ask for it, it’s theirs too.” and without so much as a question mark in response to the 4th Amendment. According to them, “It only exist for those other people, we don’t count.” After all, if you want to play, you have to pay, right? And since Google and Facebook are such amiable friends with the NSA, there is no reason for them to start deciding “who” they will service “their way” like Burger King, when it already has the fulfillment needs of the US government. Then, there is always FACEBOOK’s very aggressive destruction of the 4th Amendment where guns are concerned. You don’t want to get caught with those in hand when blogging in their back yard, you just might find your account gone with the wind.