13 Comments

Summary:

Google has finally released its internal diversity numbers, showing a lack of female and minority representation — especially in its tech sector.

After tip-toeing around the makeup of its workforce for a while, Google released a blog post Wednesday afternoon that gave a breakdown of the company’s diversity in both gender and ethnicity.

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Collected from data gathered in January of 2014, the employee base of Google is predominantly white and male (61 percent and 70 percent, respectively), with nearly a third of employees identifying as Asian.

But the overall numbers not entirely representative of the diversity in the company’s most important parts. For example, employees in leadership roles at Google are 72 percent White and 79 percent male:

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But the biggest disparities, perhaps unsurprisingly, are in the company’s tech employees. Women don’t even make up a fifth of the company’s tech workforce — representing just 17 percent.

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Laszlo Bock, Senior Vice President of People Operations and blog author, said that Google is actively trying to recruit more women and minorities for its staff: “But we’re the first to admit that Google is miles from where we want to be—and that being totally clear about the extent of the problem is a really important part of the solution.”

Google, along with other tech companies, have been pressured to release their diversity numbers by Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr., who showed up to an HP shareholders meeting to discuss the lack of inclusion in tech companies.

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  1. Stephan Klaschka Wednesday, May 28, 2014

    Insightful diversity breakdown of the Google workforce. Would be interesting to know how its Silicon Valley neighbors compare.

    1. Isn’t it nice that women can stay home and take care of the children while the men provide an income to support the entire family. Hello, basically 63% of the population is white, 12% is African American, 12% is Hispanic (legal population) and 13% other races. What per cent of the other races are working?…….Hello we only have a 5% unemployment across America. So White men fit in with the norms…..so why are you such a pot stirrer of non-direction facts. Basically, what is your point? You don’t like white men working?

  2. Gerry Corbett Wednesday, May 28, 2014

    What is the age breakdown?

  3. Gerry Corbett Wednesday, May 28, 2014

    It would be instructive and interesting to see the breakdown by age. Is it available?

  4. I’m more concerned with what could be done to increase diversity. I’d like to see an investment in the education of the demographic that we’d like to see increased in the workforce.

    1. I think education is a huge issue, but culture is also important. Kids are picked on when they want to explore computers and programming in school. So either they accept being social outcasts, or they go with the flow and decide to play football instead. The outcasts end up being the only ones cultivating their interest into a passion, an education and a career. We need to find ways to make tech less uncool (or at least insulate them more from the pressure of those that think it is) so that kids don’t feel like they have to make that choice.

  5. Would LOVE to see the age breakdown as well. Diversity should include a mix of ages, rather than a workforce dominated by 20 somethings. What pc of the workforce is over 40?

  6. Matthew Howell Wednesday, May 28, 2014

    People that talk about “diversity” are the same people that keep bringing up the racism issue, even when it’s not there.
    So maybe, just maybe there’s a very small chance that whoever is doing the hiring for Google is being discriminatory against minorities…But the more likely answer is that all of the good candidates are white males.
    Telling them to give the job to a less qualified candidate just because he’s a minority is what’s really discrimination.

    1. Edit:

      The more likely answer is that there are more qualified candidates that are white males.

      1. To be clear, “all of the good candidates are white males” should not be interpreted “only white males can be good candidates”. Software engineers are hired in the same proportion as the recipients of computer science degrees, at least on the gender front. If there’s discrimination occurring here that unfairly benefits males, it’s happening before graduation, and probably has more to do with getting women interested in the field enough to pursue it for their degree and career choice. Blacks and hispanics, similarly, graduate in far fewer numbers across the board. “Qualification” is really the effect when the focus should be on the causes.

  7. because skin color is so important.

  8. i understand the issue here, but i am also a techie/geeky person with lots programmer friends and i am sorry to say that i have never met a black female programmer.

    most programmers/techs tend to be white or Asian males.

    the more troubling numbers are the management ones. why are white males getting promoted more often?

  9. is Indian also White ?

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