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The reign of the U.S. is nearly over when it comes to handset revenues. Research firm Strategy Analytics pegs 2014 as the year that China unseats the U.S. thanks to an expected 430 million handset sales in China by year-end. That’s far and away above the 163 million to be sold in the U.S. All of those phones in China will produce revenues of $87 billion, compared to the $60 billion for U.S. phone sales. The revenue figures show that the U.S. market is skewed higher to expensive smartphones, unlike China whose smartphone growth is in the early stages while 3G and 4G networks are built out.

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  1. The US market revenue is that high due to the lack of any kind of competition. Carriers own the market, they decide who can sell and keep the prices high.
    China is free, free to have 100 times more devices and half the price for similar hardware.
    Most of the difference in ASP between the 2 markets is not due to mix but to the ridiculous US prices and lack of devices on shelves.

  2. I just love how these stupid writers keeps printing “China to overtake the U.S. in…”. China has more people than USA. So to all you so called writers out there, here’s a few headlines that I am offering for you to write about. I won’t even charge you for my intellectual property :)

    China to overtake the U.S. in rice consumption this year.
    China to overtake the U.S. in bottled water consumption this year.
    China to overtake the U.S. in number of people with two hands this year.
    China to overtake the U.S. in chopsticks usage this year.
    China to overtake the U.S. in pencil usage this year.

    1. I had to laugh when I saw this. I get your point, but I think most if not all of your examples are actually wrong so I’m glad you’re not charging us. China couldn’t overtake the U.S. in something if it always led in that category: rice, people with two hands, chopsticks usage. ;)

      And I think you missed the point: the smartphone revolution is moving on to a larger economy where there’s still tons of potential. That’s worth noting if you’re a developer, handset maker, etc…. maybe even a pencil maker. LOL!

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