5 Comments

Cisco CEO John Chambers complained directly to President Barack Obama over the NSA’s alleged bugging of U.S. telecommunications equipment sent overseas, including Cisco’s own equipment. In a letter cited over the weekend by the Financial Times and Re/Code (and published by the latter), Chambers said the exposed surveillance tricks would undermine confidence in U.S. tech firms’ products, and begged Obama to set new “rules of the road”. Cisco has already complained about NSA “backdoor” revelations in recent months, and it continues to see orders drop off in emerging markets in the wake of the Snowden leaks.

  1. Nice Follow Up

    Reply Share
  2. Our Country today sounds like the Orwellian dictatorships we were warned against during th 50’s and 60’s Cold War.

    Reply Share
  3. And what are these emerging markets users looking to buy instead? Huawei? LOL.

    Reply Share
  4. Good, I hope he gets on their case.
    Leslie

    Reply Share
  5. Let us not forget that the United States government is perhaps the largest customer of telecommunications equipment and that single fact, in and of itself, is a coercive influence on the companies that choose to do business with the government.

    It would be next to impossible for any vendor to turn down a government request if it was presented as a “national security” imperative. And, unfortunately, there is no single government entity, agency or person, who can verify that it is a legitimate request.

    The solution is to elect honest politicians and kill the revolving door between the regulators and the regulated.

    Reply Share