Summary:

Eight months after Microsoft bought Nokia’s Devices and Services division for $7.17 billion, it’s official: Microsoft is no longer only a software giant but is also one of the world’s largest handset makers.

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Eight months after Microsoft bought Nokia’s Devices and Services division for $7.17 billion, it’s official: Microsoft is no longer only a software giant but is also one of the world’s largest handset makers, after shareholders and regulatory agencies approved the deal. Nokia sold over 30 million handsets in 2013, and this deal immediately makes Microsoft the hardware supplier for 90 percent of the Windows Mobile market.

The Nokia acquisition “brings key capabilities around supply chain, distribution, operational processes and systems and skill in managing hardware margins to Microsoft,” Microsoft said in a blog post Friday morning.

Nokia spokeswoman Tiina Jaatinen said, “As Microsoft, we will continue to produce, sell and support the phones and devices you have come to love, including our award-winning Lumia and Asha ranges, feature phones and the Nokia X family of devices.”

As noted earlier this week, the Nokia division will retain separate offices and will be renamed Microsoft Mobile.

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