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Summary:

The Series C round brings total funding to about $37 million for the purveyor of real-time network monitoring service.

Boundary CEO Gary Read
photo: Boundary

Boundary, the company behind a real-time cloud monitoring service, has raised $22 million in Series C funding. The round was led by Adams Street Partners, plus previous investors. That brings total funding for the company to about $38 million since its founding in 2010.

As more companies deploy their applications in the cloud — or across clouds — being able to pinpoint bottlenecks or other pain points before they become catastrophic is what products like Boundary are supposed to do. In theory, outages like WhatApp’s snafu Wednesday could be prevented by the proactive use of such services.

The Mountain View, Calif.-based company will use the funding to expand its R&D team in Austin and Silicon Valley and to boost sales and marketing in the U.K., said CEO Gary Read (pictured above) via email.

Boundary raised $15 million in Series B funding in July 2012. Other backers include Triangle Peak Partners, Lightspeed Venture Partners and Scale Venture Partners.

The company’s product gives customers second-by-second updates on what’s going on in their networks, including assets running in Amazon Web Services, Google Compute Engine etc. Boundary competitors include Datadog, CloudynFinally.ioServer Density, and Stackdriver.

The company claims customers including Salesforce.com, The Weather Channel, Zendesk, Gilt, Expedia, Infor, Heroku, Websense, HCL Technologies and Rackspace, for which it says it processes up to 2 trillion metrics every day.

  1. Let’s hope that this new capital can finally help Boundary find its focus.

    Their product has always had a very vague value proposition. It’s not exactly log management like Splunk, SumoLogic, Loggly and it’s not exactly an APM system like NewRelic or AppDynamics. I am sure CTOs/CIOs would be hard-pressed to answer as to what exact problem Boundary is solving. In fact, if you look at Boundary’s website, they have a bunch of jargon that’s pretty meaningless like “Enterprise Event Management”, “Real-Time Application Topology,” “Application Flow Streaming.” Flow Streaming? Really?

    I guess all of this is really evident in that they were able to amass only about 100 customers or so after plowing through almost $20million.

    Dev

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    1. Sounds like sour grapes to me “Dev.” Way to be brave and post yet another anonymous flame comment. Gary and team continue to kick butt and it sounds like you may be on the receiving end.

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  2. Disruption does not fit neatly into historically defined categories – not sure who Dev is but sounds like an old timer to me that does not yet understand the needs of modern web-scale applications.

    You keep on flaming and we will keep on making customers very happy.

    “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.”
    Mahatma Gandhi

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