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Summary:

All cloud wars all the time on this week’s Structure Show. Google and AWS trade body blows, which means only good things for users.

The Structure Show 2014

 

If there’s one thing we learned this week — if you don’t like what you’re paying for cloud, don’t worry, it’ll change. Maybe even today.  This week saw a flurry of price reductions kicked off by Google on Tuesday and trumped by Amazon(s amzn) within 24 hours. At Google Cloud Platform Live, SVP Urs Hölzle announced a sustained usage discount model for Google Compute that impressed even die-hard AWS fans weary of managing their AWS Reserved Instances.

Anki's Ben Whaley

Anki’s Ben Whaley

Our guest this week is Ben Whaley is one of those AWS lovers. He’s director of infrastructure at Anki, the company behind cool AI-driven robot cars, and he idea of sustained use discounts because they ease the headache of tracking and managing Reserved Instances to get the most bang for your buck. In his view, AWS needs to simplify such things, but then again, Google has miles to go before it can match the breadth and depth of all those AWS services.

We also learned that even the wizards of infrastructure screw up. Google’s live stream from the conference fell down for at least 10 minutes and wi-fi at the AWS Summit was a disaster.

It’s an action-packed show, so listen up!

SHOW NOTES

Hosts: Barb Darrow and Derrick Harris

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  1. This week implies that AWS and Google will probably be the only two large cloud vendors that will be left standing long term. No other vendor has cost basis as cheap as these two, and hence wont be able to keep up with their pricing. Microsoft will probably keep up for a while, but would be unlikely to suustain such low prices over the long term. VCHS, Rackspace,HP, IBM have no chance, and Cisco cloud is dead before it even started. Some will no doubt try the differentiated value argument. But it is hard to make a credible case there when AWS has so many value added services, and Google appears to be trying to get there too.

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