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Summary:

Bad vision plus Google Glass typically means spending $225 on special Glass frames. Or you could just spend a buck and custom 3-D print clips to attach Google Glass to your existing glasses.

google glass clipped

Here’s a tip to save you money: Watch what I buy and then wait just a bit, because inevitably what I spend big bucks on will either come down in price or a less expensive option will appear.

Take Google Glass, for example. Last weekend, I spent $225 on official frames and even more on lenses to purchase what I jokingly refer to as the world’s most expensive reading glasses. If you need corrective lenses, you could do the same and buy Google’s frames for Glass. Or you could spend a buck, provided you have access to a 3D printer, and make little clips that attach Glass to your existing glasses.

google glass clipped

TechCrunch highlighted the little project on Friday out of design studio Pixil 3D, but it appears the first design like this was created last year by John Fontaine. His idea — the 3D printer file can be found here —  is ingenious and simple. You simply have to measure the thickness of your current glasses frames and modify the 3D design to match. Do that, click print and you’ve just saved yourself at least $224 by reusing your glasses.

As I’ve found out with my Google Glass frames, removing the electronics and guts of Glass from Google’s titanium band is quite easy. There’s just a single screw that keeps the two together. By unscrewing it, you can pull Glass from the frames and then use the 3D printed clip to reattach it to your own glasses.

  1. Kinda hoping someone starts producing these. I’ll gladly pay a few dollars as opposed to investing a couple grand in a 3D printer :p

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