Summary:

The challenge of the current media landscape is legion: Netflix isn’t the only streaming video provider to produce high-quality video programming, and a recent story in the New York Times shows that Netflix, among others, are being taken seriously by traditional TV producers and channels.

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The entertainment awards season is in full swing, and there’s been a shakeup in the TV industry, as the original series produced for Netflix have shown. Netflix is also offering audio commentary, which is unusual for streamed content:. But this shows how things have changed in just a few short years, when mailed DVDs accounted for the majority of revenue. The success, however, is due in large part to the wild west of media analytics.

At Structure Data, we’ll explore why media analytics is actually harder than rocket science and just how integral data analytics are to changing the way media is created, consumed and distributed.

Who better to compare media analytics with rocket science than Colin Coleman? Coleman is the senior director of Analytics Products Strategy and Data Governance for Turner Broadcasting System. Coleman is also a former rocket scientist, literally: He earned a B.S. and M.S. as well as a Ph.D. from Stanford in Aeronautics Engineering.

Starting his career with NASA, he conducted large-scale analytical computations and experimental testing of helicopters, supersonic transports and re-entry space vehicles. Today he examines analytics across various TBS networks, including CNN, Cartoon Network, NBA, NCAA and TNT/TBS. He has led analytics-focused product management, product development and operations teams across a broad range of verticals, including media, financial services, B2B and aerospace. Pulling from a diverse science background in the sciences, Coleman’s talk is bound to be astronomical.

Read more here, then take a minute to register now before we sell out.

–Clare Ryan

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