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Summary:

The early adopter set and tech darlings can’t stop talking about the internet of things, but the normal consumers of the world aren’t getting excited about connected diapers or coffee makers just yet.

wunderbar

This week we focused (inadvertently) on how to get consumers to adopt the internet of things is large numbers. First up is Om Malik and I chatting about what device is the right entry point for the connected home and why everyone seems to be waiting on Apple to do something big in this sector to drive adoption. Om is very disappointed by those people.

We end with wondering if it’s apartment dwellers or programmability acting as the big challenge for mainstream adoption. In the second half of the show, I speak with Jackson Bond and Paul Hopton of Relayr, a company building a package of sensors called the Wunderbar. The company just achieved its crowdfunding goal via Dragon Innovation’s platform for its package of sensors and hub.

For those of you who are sick of yet another sensor platform, these guys are less focus on building the conditional rules to turn these sensors into a smart home or office, and more using them as a tool to get developers thinking about the internet of things. You can program these tools using traditional iOS and Android development kits, putting this into the category of products like SparkCore and Tessel that want to bridge the app development world and the hardware world.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Om Malik and Ralayr’s Jackson Bond and Paul Hopton.

  • Defining the biggest challenge for the internet of things
  • Om’s favorite connected device so far is the Hue bulbs
  • What is Wunderbar and how will it bring app developers to IoT?
  • Will people buy apps or packages of sensors that run apps?
  • Within 24 months you should be able to buy a sensor that solves a problem in the checkout line of a hardware store

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  1. HI Stacey, Great point. While everyone is going gaga over the IoT, you post seems to offer something new yet basic enough for a technology to become mainstream. The IoT is still in its nascent stage and is atleast 5-7 years away from being easily available to the average consumer, but once the initial roadblocks are crossed, this thing will literally explode all over the globe.
    As predicted by Many top research firms like Gartner and IDC, that by 2020 IoT will be connecting around 212 billion devices. Now that’s a huge number. Also supplementing this trend is the emergence of the Tech triad- Cloud, Mobile & Big Data. The revenue potential being estimated is to the tune of 8+ trillion dollars.

    It will be interesting to know which organizations are driving this forward in terms of building platforms,
    products. Also the role software vendors would play in this huge ecosystem.

    Following up on this, I came across and registered for a webinar on Internet of Things- Driving the Next Decade http://j.mp/1lvIuQC

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