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Summary:

Watches, garages and data privacy are all topics of discussion in this weeks podcast featuring The Pebble Steel, a connected garage door opener and Sam Ramji of Apigee discussing business models for the internet of things.

pebble steel trio

This week’s podcast brings together Kevin Tofel’s new Pebble Steel purchase, my connected garage door and a deep discussion about data privacy in the connected world with this week’s guest Sam Ramji, the VP of strategy at Apigee. Kevin and I kick it off with Kevin discussing his $249 Pebble Steel and the newly launched Pebble app store.

One of the challenges he’s discovered is that apps designed for the Pebble are so far pretty early in their UI, and aren’t his favorite way to build apps for the watch. Instead he turns to IFTTT. The problem is that developers have hundreds of connected devices they’ll soon have to support, but we’re not sure the best format for them to build apps for the many hundreds of connected devices out there. This is both a curse and an opportunity.

It ties nicely into my conversation with Ramji who spends a lot of our conversation discussing how companies should collect, store and use data collected by connected devices. We talk about EULAs for the internet of things and the business models that might capitalize on all of the user data gathered while still respecting the user. It’s a fun show, so listen up.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Kevin Tofel and Sam Ramji, VP of Strategy at Apigee.

  • Should you buy a Pebble Steel?
  • Wearables create problems and opportunity for developers
  • I installed my connected garage door but it can’t talk to anything
  • APIs are the essential link for the connected world. How do you treat that data?
  • If data is the moneymaker for the internet of things, how do you sell it?

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  1. Should be interesting to see how developers leverage this growing web (mess) of technologies. Ideally, the internet of things should represent a means of seamlessly connecting information-backed professionals with the customer to collaboratively innovate. However, without the apps yielding what T–Systems calls a zero distance environment, there isn’t much value.

    Peter Fretty

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  2. Regarding the Podcast comment where you want to have the myQ notifications land in Evernote. I don’t own a myQ garage door sensor/app, but if myQ can send you notifications via Email, you can forward them to Evernote.

    Just follow the Evernote instructions here:
    http://evernote.com/contact/support/kb/#!/article/23480523

    Your podcasts are very interesting.

    Thanks,
    Adam (Western PA, US)

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