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Summary:

Hunter Moore, who tormented hundreds of people through his nude photo website “Is Anyone Up,” was arrested this week. The feds appear to have finally found a way to stick him with criminal charges.

Federal agents have finally arrested Hunter Moore, a notorious internet figure who hosted naked pictures of women and men on his website. The arrest is a victory for those tormented by the operators of so-called “revenge porn” sites, but could also lead to new debates on speech and internet freedoms.

The details of Moore’s offenses are set out in an indictment filed in Los Angeles federal court, and reported by Time. In it, the FBI claimed Moore and another man, Charles Evens, conspired to violate anti-hacking laws by systemically breaking into hundreds of victims’ Yahoo and Google accounts in order to obtain nude photographs.

Under the alleged scheme, Moore repeatedly asked Evens to “hack more” and directed a steady stream of payments to him, ranging from $145.70 to $900, in order to obtain new photographs to post to Moore’s now-defunct website isanyoneup.com.

The decision to bring a conspiracy charge is significant because it means law enforcement agents may finally have found a way to nail Moore for actions that many consider despicable, but are not necessarily illegal. Until now, Moore appeared to be protected by a law called the DMCA, which shields website operators for content posted by their users — in other words, Moore could claim that he was simply providing a service and that any legal violations lay with those who submitted the material.

The indictment does not explain how specifically Evens “hacked” into the victims’ email accounts but, if the hacking charges stand up, the conspiracy charge against Moore appears to be strong.

This is the second major action taken against the operator of revenge porn site in recent months. In December, California officials charged a man who operated a nude photo site called “UGotPosted” with extortion; the criminal element in that case lay in the fact that the man also ran a related website called “changeyourreputation” where victims could pay money in order to remove the embarrassing photographs.

The controversy over the revenge porn sites also coincides with new attention to the related phenomenon of mugshot sites, which post arrest photos and then demand money from the subjects to remove them.

Some states have passed laws to target such sites, though some warn the laws will be ineffective and could stifle free speech.

  1. If your boy or girl friend say’s cheese run.

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