3 Comments

Summary:

Corente offers a Cloud Service Exchange that promises to make it easier to manage and run multiple, geographically dispersed public and private clouds.

Oracle said it is buying Corente, a specialist in software-defined networking in the WAN arena.

According to its website, Corente, of Bernardsville, NJ, also provides a Cloud Service Exchange which it says enables “service providers or businesses acting as their own service providers to deliver applications and network services between public and private cloud data centers or any location over any IP network.”

Terms were not disclosed, but Oracle has been buying companies across the technology spectrum, including Xsigo to beef up its network virtualization expertise two years ago.

Oracle is trying to pitch its Exa-boxes as cloud-in-a-box infrastructure that provides storage, networking and compute to power cloud services. Given Oracle’s traditional customers — big financial services companies, government agencies, drug and healthcare companies — the ability to foster the operation of a secure and federated network of clouds would be a big advantage. The Corente buy also signals some awareness that these big customers will be running non-Oracle resources.

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  1. Keith Townsend Tuesday, January 7, 2014

    What exactly is Oracle doing with these assets? I haven’t heard anything about Xsigo since Oracle’s purchase, and I’m not familiar at all with Corente. Not a slight against Corente, but Oracle seems to struggle with doing anything outside of enterprise software.

    1. i was actually wondering the same thing Keith — i’ve heard zip from xsigo since theywere bought. LMK what you hear.

  2. Antoine Hepburn Wednesday, January 8, 2014

    To understand all that goes on behind the scenes of an Oracle acquisition, I cannot recommend enough an excellent book, “High-tech planet” written by a former Oracle executive. It is a funny, terrific and insightful account of what hides behind headlines-grabbing M&As by tech firms, especially Oracle. It is a no-holds-barred description of the business culture that allows fraud, insider trading, outlandish revenue projections and product roadmaps, manipulation, deceit, and various legal and accounting schemes as part of a corporate acquisition.

    I got an education reading and now am no longer fooled by what I read in the press as I have learned to ask the right questions

    The first few chapters can be sampled for free on Amazon: http://amzn.to/czf0qw

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