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Summary:

If Samsung’s Galaxy Note 3 is just a tad too small for you to run two Android apps on-screen, maybe a larger device would work? Benchmarks suggest such a slate is coming, in the form of the Samsung Galaxy Note Pro 12.2.

Galaxy Note 10.1
photo: Alex Colon

Samsung appears ready to try a bigger Android slate in 2014, perhaps a tablet that can suffice as a laptop replacement for some. The anticipated product name is the Samsung Galaxy Note Pro 12.2, suggesting a 12.2-inch display. Benchmarks for the alleged tablet were found on Wednesday by enthusiast site SamMobile and offer a hint of what the product might have inside.

According to the Antutu benchmarks, the Note Pro 12.2 as tested used a 2560 × 1600 display with 16:10 aspect ratio. The device under test used a 2.3 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 chip, 3 GB of memory and was running Android 4.2.2. SamMobile indicates a new version of Samsung TouchWiz is on the device and the sites sources say it will look noticeably different.

Galaxy Note 10.1 pen

The tablet also has an 8 megapixel rear camera, 2.1 megapixel front sensor and IR blaster. Expected are two versions, one with Wi-Fi only and one with LTE support. Both would have 802.11ac W-Fi support, NFC, and Bluetooth 4.0 +LE. There’s no mention of a GPS radio, but I expect Samsung is also including one. As a Note product, the tablet would surely have a stylus as well.

Expectation of the device launch isn’t at next week’s Consumer Electronics Show. Instead, February’s Mobile World Congress is the likely debut.

I wouldn’t be surprised at all if Samsung does out a larger tablet as most Android slates top out around 10-inches in size. A larger display becomes very useful when you consider that Samsung is the only major Android device-maker with products that can run multiple Android applications on-screen simultaneously. I’m not sure a large slate from LG, HTC, or Sony, for example would be as useful for this reason.

Galaxy Note 10.1 multitasking

On the other hand, I find the Android experience to diminish a bit when moving it to bigger screens. The operating system and apps are more enjoyable on a smaller device, such as the Nexus 7.

That’s just my personal experience and opinion, of course: I know there are people happy with their larger Android tablets. And a 12.2-inch tablet should still be light enough and portable to take most places, even with a keyboard attachment; something that wouldn’t be surprising for Samsung to develop and offer alongside the Note Pro 12.2.

  1. Reblogged this on Capacitive Flux and commented:
    This could be very interesting. I already see a plethora of folks that use their iPad with a keyboard. Making a larger screened tablet device makes sense to me – I bet they can shrink the bezels and build a device not much larger than last gen 10″ tablets. With wacom digitizer tech inside, a 12″ Samsung tablet becomes an amazing digital canvas as well as interesting consumption device.

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    1. One other new 12-inch Android tablet is the Ramos i12 for $299 to launch later this month and features one of Intel’s newest processors plus a 1900×1200 display — worth reviewing the specs of this impressive new device — available in the U.S. through — TabletSprint

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      1. Cool thanks for that! I will have to see if it will land in Canada

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  2. I am all in favour of the bigger screen – we older folk appreciate it. Battery life, and the ability to replace a knackered battery would be interesting.

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  3. I have never understood how the whole human race becomes so blinded by what marketing people decide to give us….In regard to batteries I will never accept the sealed back syndrome of the tablet…These manufacturers are making fools out of us and most of us seem to accept this as a done deal and seem to also be caught up in the fashion of calling these tablets as throw away gadgets after the battery dies inside them…..where is the sense in that?… why do we not become more vocal and demand some sense from manufacturers manufacturers and accept nothing but some basic sense….A battery is supposed to be removable from inside the gadget ….rechargeable batteries ideally need to be charged in an external charger where they can breathe….Two batteries are better than one for a portable gizmo…One powering the machine while the other one is on standby fully charged and waiting to fire up when needed….All the justification from manufacturers about the need for sealed backs and the need for slim tablets is a lot of nonsense when you weigh up the morals of removable batteries…..and all these makers of tablets are letting their marketing people talk so much nonsense in order to sell good looking sexy looking gadgets which only cater to the short term lifespan ideology and not to the real value of the machine…and it’s long life possibility….
    I am happy with my Galaxy Not 1 and Note 2 and soon I will get myself the Note 3 when I can find one cheap….I love my Note pallets because I can remove the batteries at will and charge them externally.I am extremely happy with this arrangement and I would love this facility to be available to me in Note 10.1 and in Note 12.2 as well ….The Note is an amazing product system and it needs to be built for a long life span …I think will be used by students artists designers and a lot of interesting people who also value the use of the hand and writing and drawing
    SO PLEASE LET US AT LEAST HAVE A GALAXY NOTE TABLET 10.1 AND 12.2 HAVE USER REMOVABLE BATTERIES….AND YOU WILL WIN THE TABLET WAR FOR A VERY LONG TIME TO COME .

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  4. Maaen, I appreciate your comments – as someone who regularly disassembles iPhones and tablets to replace batteries, it is clear that form is being put ahead of function. The “sealed” nature of many modern gadgets could be seen as no more than part of a deliberate “planned obsolescence” strategy by the manufacturers to keep the wheels of commerce turning (like the great light-bulb scandal). I like to think that I can keep my gadgets as long as I can, but the truth is things just don’t “last” as long these days, not because the battery wears out, nor because it stops working, but because things are so connected nowadays and standards & services external to my device change and are no longer compatible. I still use Windows XP on a 6 year old IBM thinkpad because quite frankly, a new Windows 8 laptop doesn’t do anything more, and I’m old, and I don’t learn new things unless I have to. I read a blog (rant) a while back written by a fellow service engineer, who was dismayed at Apple’s recent trend of producing laptop computers (like the Macbook Air) where everything is soldered directly to the pcb and can’t be upgraded. Interestingly, he pointed out, Apple, tried offering their Macbook Pro machines in both the “legacy” design, where the user could replace the battery, hard-drive, RAM etc., and the new slim, sexy style which can’t be upgraded, only replaced. The buying public spoke loud & clear, the legacy MBP line has now been dropped. Seems the tech industry first tells us what we need, then sells it to us..

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    1. Hello Gordon….I am very grateful for your comments…They resonate well amongst the sensible folk….It makes me sad that such is the way with the world….If only we could speak with some force with the likes of Samsung…even if only because Samsung has the large tablet about to make its entrance amongst us ….and since it has the S Pen it will undoubtedly have a longer useful life amongst so many millions of us around the globe… and one would have expectedSamsung to employ some sensible marketing people with the moral fibre to understand that life span of certain tech gear equates with greater long life values…..but we shall see what happens …I am going to make a big noise about this battery business until I either get on people’s nerves or make revolutionaries out of them…..but thank you for you sympathetic thoughts …Happy New Year.

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  5. This tablet should be great for a musician’s PDF lead sheets. Most 10 inch tablets are a little short on resolution, particularly when the sheets were already fuzzy before imaging.

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