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Summary:

Does Google Glass need another input method? The team behind Remotte thinks so: It’s looking to raise $70,000 on Kickstarter for the connected device. Even if you don’t have Glass, this could be a handy little remote control.

remotte

Google Glass already has a few input methods: You can speak to Glass or use the side touchpad to navigate around. Does it need another? A team of developers think so, which is why they debuted the Remotte on Kickstarter. The project started up on Wednesday and hopes to raise $70,000 to bring its Google Glass remote control to market.

I’ve used Google Glass for the past several weeks and the first thought I had when hearing about the Remotte was, “Why?” After thinking it through, I actually do see some use-cases where a remote control for Glass could be helpful. Perhaps you’re wearing Glass in a place where silence is golden: I wouldn’t want to speak voice commands in a library or certain other public places, for example. Sure, I could tap the side touchpad, but there are times when it would just be easier to tap a remote control in my pocket. It would look less obtrusive as well.

But Remotte may not just be limited to Google Glass. Take a look at this explanatory video that shows some other potential uses for computers, cameras and other connected devices.

Remotte includes many of the same sensors and inputs as Glass — think a gyroscope, accelerometer, buttons, LED lights and  a touchpad — so it could be adopted to a number of devices:

“Using Remotte is simple. It works “natively” and on most of your devices there’s no need to download any application. You can use it as a “remote trigger ” for your mobile camera and be there in your family photo. You can also amaze your friends making videos of a sunset in “time lapse” or special effects using the “stop motion” and of course run your favorite music player, advance your presentation slides or whatever comes to mind … You can also use Remotte in games and other compatible applications specifically created by developers.”

Some of these non-Glass uses will depend on developers of course. But even if those uses never appear, I see some potential just to remote control Google Glass. For as little as $49 during the early bird special, I just may back it.

  1. I think Remotte can become a nice additional feature for the upcoming Google Glasses. Previous researches on the use of smart glasses point out that one of the major issues of using these devices is that the arm of the user gets tired after a prolonged use. For every input the user wants to make he has to move his arm to eye height. Users do not complain about this when there interaction time is short, but they do start complaining about the tiring arm when the interaction is long. One of the solutions implemented in the Google Glasses is to use voice commands or the use of the My Glass APP like mentioned in the video. These are definitely solutions for the tiring arm, but these solutions do require the user to focus on these interaction and to lose control of their environment for a moment. For example during a conversation you can’t use voice commands and looking at your phone during a conversation is not appreciated most of the time. A solution that was suggested for this problem by researchers, is to register the touch gestures at chest height instead of at eye height. I feel Remotte is an example of this, but with Remotte you are not limited to chest height. You can just hold it in your hand and use it in any position. Remotte is also usable without losing the focus with your environment. While you are watching in front of you or having a conversation you can use all the features of your Google Glasses without having to look away.

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