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Summary:

Intel isn’t letting rivals take all the business in the gold rush that is the internet of things. With a new family of chips, a Hadoop distribution and several acquisitions, Intel’s making a big play.

ton-steenman_1
photo: Intel

A month ago Intel announced the Quark family of chips for the internet of things, but released few details, and then last Tuesday the chip giant pulled together a vision for the internet of things that involved everything from its traditional x86-based server chips all the way to its 2009 purchase of Wind River. And of course its new Quark chips.

Ton Steenman, VP and GM of Intel’s Intelligent Systems Group, joined me on the podcast this week, to discuss the new products Intel is releasing, as well as how the chip giant sees the internet of things ecosystems evolving. It’s a big believer in openness and working with partners, and it’s well aware that most people will be trying at first to connect their existing products and analyze data from them. Steenman told me that 85 percent of the information companies want to use is already coming in via a legacy infrastructure.

That’s why Intel’s building out gateway products for different industries based on the Wind River software. Steenman believes those boxes will be the path corporate data takes to get it into a larger, less industry specific arena. We also discussed the details on the new Quark family of processors and how Intel is already saving money by analyzing real-time sensor data.

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Show notes:
Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guest: Ton Steenman, VP and GM of Intel’s Intelligent Systems Group

  • How Intel thinks about the internet of things
  • Why the company has been silent about it for the last year or two
  • The secret for businesses is data
  • What to expect from the Quark chips and can Intel crush its non-x86 rivals?

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  1. Curiously enough, we’re quite happy with Intel’s 33-year old 8051 core for our Internet of Things platform. As Shane Dyer of Arrayent said on GigaOM: “In the end, the internet of things isn’t about cramming computers into places where they don’t belong, but by doing more with a mere eight bits than anyone ever thought possible.”

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