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Summary:

By finally just saying what we’ve all known forever — that Microsoft competes with its biggest and oldest partners, (Intel too!) HP’s CEO let some fresh air into the room.

Anyone who didn’t think Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard have been competing as much as collaborating hasn’t been paying attention for, oh, the last 3, 4, 5 years. But the growing tension — which spiked when Microsoft said it would build its own Surface devices — was always spackled over.

Microsoft’s subsequent decision to buy Nokia’s handset business and its explicitly stated goal of becoming a “devices and services” company put all doubt to rest, except none of the big wigs really admitted it.

Until this week, when HP CEO Meg Whitman came clean in a speech to analysts. She cited “profound changes in the competitive landscape. Our competitors are expanding across the IT stack. Current partners like Intel and Microsoft are turning from partners into outright competitors.”

Signs have been there for a long time, since even before the Microsoft Vista debacle that badly injured hardware partners, and the promised-but-never-delivered HP Windows Azure appliance.

All I can say is: What a relief. Now these competitors can get down to business without all the coopetition B.S. They’ve all got their own clouds, hardware, software, services and management tools all vying for the same enterprise customers.

Welcome to Thunderdome. Let the games begin.

  1. Campbell Soupe Friday, October 11, 2013

    Compete with what, Hatchet? Your failed attempts of designing your own OS, your failed attempts of actually creating printer without the help of Canon and Xerox? Your failed attempts at “Controlling” the server market? Or your failed attempts to actually create a profit stream with products rather then firing most of your employees? The fact of the matter is you’re just a overzealous reseller looking for a handout to keep the lights on. HP is like Shang Tsung who absorbs the souls of those he slays in order to maintain his youth and power, but retains no soul his own. “Welcome to Thunderdome. Let the games begin” are you seriously going to use that? Sure thing OS’less, yeah, let the games begin indeed, because every team needs a sparring partner to scrimmage off of. Let the games begin, you’re a fool!

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  2. Microsoft is a fierce competitor, particularly in areas that it sees as strategically important. Cloud is a good example.

    http://fakevalley.com/microsoft-celebrates-100th-windows-azure-customer/

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  3. I see Microsoft starting to be extremely aggressive now. With the new surface 2 docking station the tablet really can be used as a PC replacement. That’s really crossing a line imho.

    The other big announcement I have seen recently is that Microsoft is going to let their “channel” partners, i.e. vars, service providers, etc. start to sell the Surface 2. So Microsoft will be going after the enterprise market hard.

    Microsoft is declaring all out war against the OEMs. I will not be surprised to see some OEMs stop making Windows devices and put everything behind chrome/android and linux.

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  4. thedesertvoice Friday, October 11, 2013

    Typical looser attitude, blame others for your own errors.

    HP as a company have had the time, the resources, the knowledge to create great products, but ultimately they go for the bottom line, profits.

    Then, instead to create high quality products they squeeze profit from the cheapest product you can market, that watered down the brand equity to the point that when you think HP your mental picture is a cheap printer with overpriced ink cartridges.

    Now the once proud tech company have their logo slapped in the cheapest tablets and chromebooks. If they think that can revert their fate with the marginal profit of $180 tablet or $300 chromebook, good luck.

    They could become a major player in smartphone market with webOs, but they don’t have the balls to go ahead, I only can imagine, now that blackberry is almost dead, what they could have been achieved.

    Would be hard for an once innovative company see that a newcomer deliver a better device in the first shot. Surface tablets was a breakthrough pc device, meanwhile the best that HP could deliver is a copy of the MacBooks with his envy line.

    So, the sour grapes are understandable.

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  5. Marthinus Swart Sunday, October 13, 2013

    Guessing nothing will keep HP from fading away now, they have no direction.

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  6. There seems to be a lot of disdain thrown HP’s way from the comments listed. Be interesting to no why!

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  7. But, wasn’t HP who started this, with their Android tablets, purchase of WebOS? They expected MS to just sit back & watch?

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