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Summary:

Looking for a touchscreen Chromebook but don’t want the $1.299 price tag of a Pixel? The upcoming Acer C720 may have you covered based on reports of a touchscreen option.

Two-Pixels

Talk of a touchscreen Chromebook from Acer was a discussion point on this week’s Chrome Show podcast. The touch capability will be an option on the upcoming Acer C720 Chromebook according to a Google Apps Certified Deployment Specialist who claims to have used the new Acer device. In a Google+ post, Fredrik Linnander says the C720 will have multiple configuration choices that can vary the amount of memory and the storage capacity, plus one touchscreen option.

Listen in on our thoughts, along with the expected price point, by downloading the podcast or tuning in below. This week’s show also covers new cloud torrenting options and how to get the old “new tab” page back into Chrome.

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  1. C270? You mean C720

    1. Thanks for that; fixed!

  2. Let’s face it guys, The Chromebook project is a failure.

    1. Agreed. I mean it’s the best selling notebook on Amazon, adopted by 1 in 5 U.S. school districts according to Google and part of Google’s strategy to take over the desktop with its own set of apps. Total disaster! ;)

      1. Hahaha…I think the Chromebook is pretty sweet. It’s like the hybrid between a full laptop and an Android tablet. I wish they all had touchscreens though!

  3. You mean C720

  4. I am just one guy who listens to your podcast and not trying to be a troll. So I played around with it at the Best Buy. The only thing about it is that it is cheap, shockingly cheap. That is most likely why the schools like it and because it is hyper-limited in functionality. Besides, I would not use our broken public school system’s decisions as a measure of a platform’s success. The war to take over the desktop is yesterday’s war.

    1. Everything that is in ChromeOS is moving to Android. The web apps from ChromeOS are going to be in your Android launcher and use an “appified” Chrome to run them. Chrome is going to end up being Google’s one user-facing strategy. It may not crush MS and Apple on the desktop, but it definitely won’t fail.

  5. Give Google and their hardware partners credit for sticking with the Chromebook, despite a lot of resistance. The more improvements they make, the more the Chromebook becomes attractive to more users.

    But what about Chromebook users that need to access Windows applications like Microsoft Office, or that want to connect to work applications like CRM and ERP from home? They can try products like Ericom AccessNow, an HTML5 RDP solution that enables Chromebook users to connect to Terminal Servers and/or VDI virtual desktops, and run Windows applications or desktops in a browser tab.

    There’s nothing to install on the Chromebook, so AccessNow is easy to deploy and manage.

    For an online, interactive demo, open your Chrome browser and visit:
    http://www.ericom.com/demo_AccessNow.asp?URL_ID=708

    Please note that I work for Ericom

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