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Summary:

Qualcomm is taking on AirPlay, Sonos and Spotify’s Connect platform with its own multi-room audio streaming platform dubbed AllPlay.

Qualcomm just unveiled its own take on wireless home audio streaming dubbed AllPlay, which will allow consumers to stream music to multiple compatible speakers in their home. AllPlay is based on Qualcomm’s Alljoyn networking technology, and one of the first services to make use of AllPlay is Rhapsody’s music streaming service.

AllPlay was announced at Qualcomm’s Uplinq developer conference in San Diego Wednesday, where Rhapsody president Jon Irwin joined Qualcomm CEO Paul Jacobs on stage to give a first preview of AllPlay. During the demo, Irwin showed off how consumers will be able to stream music from a mobile device to a single or multiple speakers within their home, complete with the ability to control the volume for each speaker individually.

rhapsofy allplay demo

Jacobs said that the company will partner with major audio manufacturers to launch AllPlay, and that developers will have access to the AllPlay SDK before the end of the year. The announcement came just one day after Spotify launched its own take on in-home audio streaming.

Spotify Connect makes it possible to stream music from mobile devices to speakers from a number of major manufacturers, and unlike Qualcomm, Spotify actually had some names to share. However, Spotify Connect doesn’t actually seem to support multiroom playback at this time.

This isn’t the first time Qualcomm is dabbling int he area of in-home audio streaming. Qualcomm’s Atheros unit previously launched Skifta, a DLNA-based app to shift audio inside the home.

Image courtesy of Flickr user christopheradams.

  1. This had better be good if its going to compete with Bluetooth 5 with abt-x, which finally gave Bluetooth decent audio quality which earlier iterations lacked.

    Multiple speakers with different volumes isn’t going to be enough to make anyone change. They’d either have to carrot consumers with a higher end audio standard, or they’d have to offer it without licensing fees to get manufacturers to include it?

  2. Bluetooth 5 was a typo, should have been Bluetooth 4, of course ><

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