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Summary:

Active Notifications, the app that brings Moto X-style notifications to your phone’s home screen, is now available for all phones running Android 4.0 and above.

Moto X Active Display

One of the best features on the new Moto X is its Active Display, which lets you receive updates and notifications even when its phone is asleep. Android developer Great Bytes Software was quick to respond to with Active Notifications, an app that brings similar functionality to a much wider range of Android phones. But whereas the initial release was only available on the few phones out there running Android 4.3, an update makes it compatible with all phones running Android 4.0 and later.

According to Great Bytes, support for Android 4.0 to 4.2 is only experimental at the moment. But if it works on your phone, the only thing you’re missing out on is the “NotificationListenerService” feature, which isn’t available on earlier builds of Android.

Otherwise, Active Notifications will place important notifications on your screen when it is off, letting you decide if they’re important enough to act on. The app is free, but the $0.99 premium version lets you hide notifications at night, adjust privacy settings and screen brightness, and automatically switch the phone off when dismissing notifications.

It may not be quite as full-featured and power-efficient as the Active Display on the Moto X, but if you’ve got a different phone and you’re running a recent version of Android, it looks like a pretty good substitute.

  1. Did anybody not notice the message you get befor you enable it? It freaking collects all data you type. Verbatim it reads, “ActiveNotifications can collect all of the text you type, except passwords. This includes personal data such as credit card numbers. It can also collect data about your interactions with the phone.” Immediately uninstalled it.

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    1. Any third party keyboard or input application, such as thumb keyboard or wiimote controller IME also bears this warning. I use both of these applications. I understand your natural response, but what do you expect from applications that require global interaction? Not sure what exactly youre afraid of, but at some point these feats require trust.

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  2. So, the developer made this fantastic app and charges $1 for the premium version (which I gladly paid once I saw it worked on my Galaxy Nexus) with millions of Android phones out there… all so he/she can skim credit card numbers?
    He/she has the potential of making hundreds of thousands of dollars off this app. These warnings are standard cookie cutter warnings. Anything is possible but I think highly doubtful. Even if he gets my card number, I’m not responsible for the charges as long as I dispute them within 90 days.
    As far as the app goes, I love it. Now just going to keep an eye on battery usage.

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