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Summary:

Amazon outranks the field in Gartner IaaS rankings, but there were lots of other winners including CSC, Microsoft, Tier 3, Joyent and Rackspace.

Normally, I don’t pay too much attention to rankings of analyst firms, but this year’s Gartner “Magic Quadrant for Cloud Infrastructure as a Service” definitely caught my eye.

Amazon Web Services, no shocker here, ranked highest both in terms “ability to execute” and “completeness of vision – the two main criteria of the report. But depending on how you slice the metrics either CSC, the big IT services provider or Microsoft, which has been spending heavily to build up Windows Azure as an IaaS, came in second. Also not surprising was that Rackspace, the self-proclaimed king of OpenStack, did well. But there were some smaller players that also got kudos.

Here are my top takeaways after glancing through the summary.

  • CSC is a big winner because “unlike other traditional data center outsourcers, CSC has fully embraced the highly standardized, highly automated cloud model, successfully blending the benefits of a true cloud service into an enterprise-ready offering.”
  • Tier 3 was praised for offering “an excellent, highly differentiated set of features on a well-engineered platform with an easy-to-use self-service portal. It is one of the few services with both cloud-native capabilities that are attractive to developers and the governance and management features needed by large enterprises.”
  • Joyent got props for its “unique vision for cloud IaaS and is exceptionally innovative from a technology perspective. It is developing an integrated technology stack and its infrastructure offerings verge into the platform space. It is making deep investments in fundamental technologies, including its own SmartOS operating system, based on Illumos Solaris and its x86 hypervisor.”
  • IBM was lauded for its breadth of vision spanning private and public clouds at both system and application layers, but it ranked poorly. It was dinged for a feature set that lags that of its competitors. On the bright side, it completed its $2 billion acquisition of Softlayer which, Gartner called a “thought leader in automated, highly standardized infrastructure services, provisioned on demand.”
  1. d

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  2. Yet another reason nobody takes Gartner seriously…CSC is an IT outsourcer. Any “cloud” business they’re doing takes a back seat to soaking you for consulting fees and billable hours. What a bunch of haloney

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    1. It would appear that the title of the this publication has been proven accurate!

      “Duh, Amazon tops Gartner’s cloud Magic Quadrant, but number two may surprise you”

      You certainly seem surprised…

      For Enterprise Cloud it would appear that CSC have topped the charts. Being able to have a true consumption based model that works across applications like SAP certainly does seem surprising but it is here and going strong.

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  3. Hm… interesting statement. Can you provide a reference for your claim? Just curious.

    While, yes, CSC is an out-sourcer, they do a lot more. Out-sourcing is one of the many services that they provide. Perhaps a necessary evil. I don’t like that facet, but there is a market for it. So, are you angry at CSC, or the companies that hire CSC?

    Now, regarding YOUR “haloney”: Would you hire someone to NOT fulfill a need? Aside from undertakers and life insurance, you usually want to take advantage of what you pay for.

    Management is something that, if you pay for it, you want your money’s worth. Sometimes you pay people to save you money — maybe not you, but other people do. You can always find a way to do things less expensively. When you can do that, you save money. When you can do something better, less expensively, then you’ve done more than save money.

    If you spend millions on data centers (I’m probably off by a factor of 10) and you can save $$ by moving to the cloud, then you might consider it. If you could save $$, and get flexible platforms, on-demand storage expansion, scalability, multiple flavors of OS/DB/apps, automagic BU and DR, and drop facilities (and labor) costs by moving to the cloud, why would you NOT?

    From the place you’ve posted, I can assume you work in IT. Have you been out-sourced? If so, I am very sorry for you – these are scarey times, for any job market. When you were working, did you make a wage? Did you charge for your services? That’s what I do.

    And, just to be clear, I work for CSC. I’m not in “out-sourcing”. Over a decade in defense db and BI, some commercial, some SA, some of this, some of that. Probably nothing, compared to what some folks can (rightfully) claim.

    And, I fed my family, and put food on the tables of other people who worked because of what I was doing. And, as trite as it sounds, I supported our country (et, mine… I don’t know where you’re from).

    I know that’s not much, but I’ve enjoyed my time @ CSC, and I hope it continues for a long time.

    I’m not in out-sourcing — but there are plenty of companies that are demanding more-with-less. Those are the companies that hire CSC.

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