2 Comments

Summary:

Losing your stuff happens all the time, but a connected tag called Tile wants to use Bluetooth and your smartphone to make finding your keys — or even a stolen bike — easier.

Photographer

Last week Tile, a connected tag that you can affix to purses computers, bikes etc. and then track them has scored $2.6 million via a homegrown crowdfunding campaign. The technology inside Tile, and the way it takes advantage of peer-to-peer sourcing of tracking data for items makes it potentially disruptive as we discuss in this week’s podcast with Mike Farley, the COO of Tile.

Tile COO Mike Farley

Tile COO Mike Farley

Tile lets people track their own lost items using the Tile and a smartphone app, but it gets really interesting when an item is marked as lost. Then phones of the other people running the Tile app can see the item and tell it where it is. Your phone then gets the equivalent of a last seen at, notification. With enough users, that’s a pretty compelling value proposition because you could theoretically find out where your stuff is at any time. Then Tile becomes a poor man’s GPS.

We discuss that and why Tile used an open source crowdfunding campaign builder known as Selfstarter. It was used by the folks at connected lock maker Lockitron as well. Farley discusses the pros and cons of avoiding Kickstarter or Indiegogo and why other hardware companies might embrace the Selfstarter model. Check it out.

(Download this episode)

Internet of Things Show RSS Feed

Subscribe to this show in iTunes

Listen on Stitcher

Show notes:
Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guest: Mike Farley, COO of Tile

  • Introducing Tile, a lost and found using the internet of things
  • Tile can help you find stolen goods, but could it replace GPS?
  • Words of wisdom on choosing an alternative crowdfunding platform

PREVIOUS IoT PODCASTS:

Podcast: Home on the Range, connected kitchen gadgets heat up

Podcast: Sensors stalking while you’re shopping may not be so bad

Podcast: IFTTT’s new iPhone app and a Purple Rain recipe

Podcast: What the bathroom door can tell caregivers about your health

Podcast: Freak out! ZigBee and Z-Wave are doomed!

Podcast: I love lamp! No, really, the Goodnight Lamp looks awesome

Say goodbye to the connected device price gap. Adding connectivity will soon cost $5

Podcast: Securing the internet of things is like securing our borders. Impossible.

Podcast: How to design a connected device that isn’t a jerk, plus IoT’s recipe for success

Podcast: The history of the internet of things includes a Swedish hockey team and LEGOs

Podcast: Power to the people — and all their connected devices

How the internet of things may make parents less worried but more neurotic

Shark Week for the internet of things

  1. What happens when the battery gets low on power after a year? Is there anyway to recharge or replace the battery?

    1. That’s the tracking as a service cost of $18.95. You send them back and get a new one for $18.95 or whatever the new subscription rate is for that new year. I can only assume as they get better at it the price will come down and other competing services come up. I guess it depends on how much traction they get in their first year.

      I’m game to try it.

Comments have been disabled for this post