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Summary:

Forget the idea of the connected fridge for moment. What other kitchen gadgets might you connect if you had the means? In this week’s podcast we talk to Supermechanical’s John Kestner about it’s new connected thermometer.

rangered
photo: Supermechanical

One of my laments about the internet of things is that many of the devices focus on solving problems that are a matter of convenience. So while it’s cool that I can turn on my lights from my smartphone or buy a scale that tweets my weight, connectivity should add more value. And the kitchen is one place where I see a lot of potential value.

Lucky for me John Kestner, a designer with Supermechanical feels the same way. Supermechanical has just launched a Kickstarter for a connected thermometer (two of them actually) called Range. The team is the same one that brought us the Twine sensor that was basically an open-ended device that could tell you when your basement was leaking or if your fridge thawed. It was one of the precursors to many of the sensor platforms on the market today.

After Kestner and I finished talking about connecting the kitchen and his idea of quantified cooking, we discussed what he learned about marketing connected devices. He’s sold a very broadly applicable device with little or no direction for the average consumer and is now selling a dedicated device for a narrow vertical. Listen to the podcast to learn which model he thinks is the one that will succeed. Plus, we’ll take the internet of things beyond the connected fridge to connected pots and pans.

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Show notes:
Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guest: John Kestner, a designer with Supermechanical

  • What Supermechanical learned from its Twine sensor
  • Meet Range, the new connected thermostat
  • What is quantified cooking and how can the internet of things improve the kitchen?
  • What he learned from building a really open device versus a dedicated device and what that says about how the internet of things will develop

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  1. Nicholas Paredes Thursday, July 25, 2013

    While I like the simplicity of an attachment (ie. plug into the headphone jack), the iGrill messages your phone across the house when a temperature has been met. Check that one out!

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    1. We mention iGrill in the post, but I have heard a lot of complaints about its reliability.

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  2. Beginer to the view country in my stay on the road …..be nice and the cown down in the stay

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