1 Comment

Summary:

By allowing users to embed their photos and videos around the web, Instagram is courting the media, which has traditionally turned to its rival Twitter for breaking news situations.

Kevin Systrom Instagram Facebook video

Just a few weeks after adding video to its service, Instagram has announced Wednesday that it plans to allow users to embed their photos and videos across the web. It’s a long-requested feature that will come as good news to a lot of users, particularly journalists and the media — a demographic Instagram is trying to attract.

Embedding photos and videos will make it easier for news outlets to add Instagram content to their sites, which is imporant as Instagram looks to distinguish its video content from that of its biggest competitor, Twitter’s Vine app (which has allowed easy embeds since March.) Instagram video, while not a hit with all users, is probably better-suited for shooting news videos than Vine because the videos can be longer and don’t have looping (which can add a silly, creative effect, rather than a serious, professional one.)

It’s easy to see how an Instagram video of a news event could go viral, and if news sites could embed that video on their sites, they would be able to give proper credit to the author while more easily sharing the content. Other sites have already provided people with ways to embed this content, but there’s no doubt Instagram wants to create a more uniform experience by doing the feature itself.

So far, Twitter has become the go-to destination for journalists both publishing and finding breaking news. But with 130 million active users, Instagram has become the domininant mobile photo-sharing app, and if it succeeds in getting journalists on its video platform, Facebook’s app could begin reversing that tide against Twitter. Instagram has recently hired a former CNN journalist to join its Menlo Park team, and the Instagram blog is constantly showing off how people use the app to document news events from around the world.

Here’s an example of an image that’s embedded on the web and what it will look like:

Instagram photo embedded on the web

And here’s where you can grab the embed code on photos:

01 - Embed Modal

Instagram explains the changes in a blog post up on Wednesday:

“Now, when you visit an Instagram photo or video page on your desktop web browser, you’ll see a new share button on the right side of your photo (just under the comments button). Click the button to see the embed code. Copy the block of text it gives you and paste it into your blog, website or article. When you hit publish, the photo or video will appear.

As always, you own your photos and videos, and we want to make sure that’s understood no matter where your content appears. Whether you want to embed your video on your blog or a friend wants to feature your photo on a website, everyone will clearly see that your content belongs to you. Your embedded photo or video appears with your Instagram username, and clicking on the Instagram logo will take people to your page on Instagram.com where they can discover more of your photos and videos.

Is your content private? Then nothing has changed. Embed code is only available to those whose photos and videos are public.”

  1. That’s what we were missing,more low res square pictures on the web….
    They’ll be great as icons on 4k screens.

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post