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Summary:

Since debuting its 41 megapixel “PureView” technology, Nokia has reportedly been working to shrink it down for a Lumia device. Based on this video, the company doesn’t look far off from accomplishing that goal.

Nokia PureView 808

Leaked information for Nokia’s next flagship Lumia continues to flow: On Friday, a video surfaced showing the alleged Windows Phone with massive 41 megapixel sensor in action. Originally dubbed “PureView” technology, Nokia demonstrated the camera quality with a prototype phone in early 2012. With the large sensor and quality optics, the so-called EOS camera takes highly detailed photos that retain image quality even when cropped down in size.

Reports of Nokia bringing this technology to a Windows Phone device surfaced in January, and based on this video from ViziLeaks and spotted by The Verge, it appears Nokia is at least testing a phone design. The marking of XX for the number of megapixels would suggest this is a test device and the actual sensor resolution will instead be displayed in lieu of the XX:

Unlike traditional smartphone cameras, PureView uses a mechanical shutter, which can be seen in the video. Although no sample shots have leaked yet, here are a few from the original PureView 808 device captured by the All About Symbian blog. Be sure to view the images at full size to see the detail when zoomed in.

No other mobile phone has such camera technology, so this could be just what Nokia, Microsoft and Windows Phone need to stand out from the crowd. Although I’m certain Nokia has been refining the technology, it’s surely going to require a thicker phone when compared to its peers. For true mobile photo enthusiasts, however, it could be just the thing to get more people to try a Lumia.

  1. Jayson Osmars Friday, June 7, 2013

    I LOVE my Lumia 920 for the camera. I compared my 4S photos I took to the 920 and it’s no contest. The camera processes faster, the colours are more vibrant, the clarity is superb. I had to prop the 4s against a solid object every single irritating time to prevent blurriness, which is nice to not have to with the 920. I am interested switching to the Z10, it’s a real good user experience for what I like to have for work but I don’t want to lose the camera quality. I would trade my 920 for this though. I really enjoy listening to MoblieTechRoundup, hopefully there’s more info on this phone to speak about soon.

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    1. I think the Z10 is nice but, compared to your 920, the camera experience won’t be nearly as good. It’s worth a look, but…..

      Given Matt’s love for Windows Phone and Nokia devices, I suspect we’ll have more to say about this phone. ;) Thanks!

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  2. Many serious photographers shun high pixel counts on small sensors due to the inherent poor picture quality at low ISO settings. The real test won’t be with sunny outdoor shots, but more with everyday natural light indoor and/or low light shots. Perhaps that’s why it has such a significant flash, which in no doubt is intended to be used more.

    Regardless, I’m happy to see a company push the boundaries of phone photography and further blur the distinction between phone and compact camera.

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    1. Totally agree with you there Dave. And this isn’t going to compare to an APS-C sensor, but it is noticeably larger than typical smartphone sensors. This one IIRC, is a 1/1.2″ sensor size.

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      1. 1/1.2″ (13.33mm x 10.67mm) Thanks, that helps a lot. That is twice the surface area of a 10MP Canon G12 sensor, and so twice the pixel density. My skepticism has significantly diminished. Looking forward
        to seeing it and it’s affect on other manufacturers.

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