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Summary:

Google Glass will now see you better, even if you’re lurking in the shadows. A software update adds HDR photo support to improve the camera in both low and bright light settings.

If you thought you could slip into the shadows and go unnoticed by someone wearing Google Glass, it’s not going to happen. Google is pushing a software update to Glass devices to improve the camera in low light. The new feature automatically detects a low-light situation and compensates to get a more detailed, brighter picture.

The Glass team is piggybacking the improvement for bright light photos as well. After the software updated is installed, Glass will automatically take HDR, or High Dynamic Range, photos in low light or bright situations. Several of the latest smartphones support HDR photography, which quickly captures multiple images at various exposure levels. The pictures are then combined to provide an improved picture with boosted brightness in low-lit areas and toned down pixels where overexposure is detected.

Google is sharing an image gallery with before and after images that illustrate the camera improvements on Glass. Here’s an example of two similar images, first without the new software and then with the update:

 

Another small feature addition is the ability to caption photos directly from Glass. When sharing a photo from the wearable device, Glass will prompt for a caption. Users can tap the side touchpad of Glass and then speak their caption before sharing the image.

While the software update may appear very incremental, Google is holding to its promise of new features in monthly software updates for Glass. That means Glass owners can expect a steady stream of new features, both big and small, for their connected glasses.

  1. Raphael Hunold Wednesday, June 5, 2013

    Obviously, these photo are not the same if you look carefully

    1. Agreed, but they couldn’t be the same if one is taking with Glass with the software update and one is taken with another Glass device without it. ;)

  2. cristiandobre0 Thursday, June 6, 2013

    Judging by the title and summary, it’s amazing how every fact and feature of Glass is used for hating on it. Bars banning Glass and terms like “glasshole” were invented even before the product was released. This feature is not even that hate-worthy but the internet hate machine is to big to stop.

    You could and should write an entire article on this hate for Glass.

  3. Jake Haenchen Thursday, June 6, 2013

    You’re obviously attempting to apply what is undoubtedly a simple article on a technical upgrade towards a hot privacy issue. Privacy concerns about Glass shouldn’t be forgotten, but this is blatantly fear mothering to attract views.

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