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Summary:

As the time ticks down toward Google Reader’s demise, Feedly — which has emerged as a leading alternative — announced that it’s partnering with a bunch of other RSS clients, including Reeder and Press.

feedly

It’s now less than a month before Google Reader shuts down, meaning that anyone who relies on the service better be testing the alternatives right about now. Feedly, which has emerged as one of the top contenders, made the choice a little easier Monday when it announced that it’s partnered with a number of other RSS apps — among them the popular iOS app Reeder.

Feedly wrote on its blog:

“We have been working behind the curtains with the developers of ReederPress, Nextgen Reader, Newsify and gReader as design partners for our Normandy project. Today we are excited to announce that you will be able to access your feedly from all these apps before Google Reader retires and that the access to feedly API will be free. More details soon.”

(The Normandy project, by the way, is how Feedly makes its API available to developers. The API is free and Feedly said it’s rolling out access gradually; developers can request access here.)

If you’re already using one of the above services, expect integration in the next couple of weeks: Newsify noted on its blog that users should “look for an update before the end of June to start using the Feedly service,” while Press said its “plan is to provide an app update in a couple weeks that will allow you to easily add your Feedly account and have the same RSS experience you’ve always enjoyed using Press.”

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  1. Pay attention when you install it: Feedly makes you give them access to track every thing you do on every single site you visit. That is far more tracking than Yahoo!, Google, Facebook, etc. They have deliberately made it impossible to use their service without thi stracking.

    Unless you trust Feedly to take notes while hovering over your shoulder at all times, find another alternative.

    1. I’m checking the permissions and all it says they have access to is basically cookies. Seems pretty standard?

  2. I’m testing feedly and feed demon. The latter seems to be better for desktop, but feedly’s display and integration into browser is quite good.

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