Summary:

Appsecute’s service promises devops a central way to manage all their cloud-based services from AWS to Zendesk.

ActiveState, the company behind the Stackato enterprise-focused platform as a service (PaaS), is buying Appsecute, a New Zealand-based startup that aims to bring single-screen management to all the cloud-based tools developers use along with a social network-like overlay so team members know what each other are doing.

It’s an interesting fit. Appsecute started out as a way to build a central way to manage multiple PaaSes but regrouped early this year to offer one way (and one screen) to deal with the many cloud tools – not just PaaSes — that devops teams use.

As Appsecute CEO Mark Cox told me in February.

“One day, we sat down and counted the number of cloud services we were using on a daily basis to build and manage our software and ended up with a total of 14 services –14 different places that our team had to stay on top of on a day to day basis – and the feedback from our users was that they were in a similar position.”

(L to R) Bart Copeland, CEO, ActiveState; Ruben Daniels, Co-Founder and CEO, Cloud9 IDE; Johan den Haan, CTO, Mendix; Richard Nicholson, CEO and Founder, Paremus; at Structure Europe 2012

(L to R) Bart Copeland, CEO, ActiveState; Ruben Daniels, Co-Founder and CEO, Cloud9 IDE; Johan den Haan, CTO, Mendix; Richard Nicholson, CEO and Founder, Paremus; at Structure Europe 2012 JULIADEBOER PHOTOGRAPHY http://www.juliadeboer.com

The initial release had connectors for Github, Zendesk, Tender Support, CircleCI, AppFog, Cloudfoundry.com, and Heroku with more connectors promised for New Relic, Amazon Web Services,  full Cloud Foundry, Travis CI, Jenkins CI, Team City, Pingdom, PagerDuty, RSS, Twitter, Facebook, SNMP, Nodejitsu, EngineYard, OpenShift, Rackspace, Nagios, Sendgrid, Mailchimp and Cloudability.

Stackato is not mentioned there, but since it’s based on Cloud Foundry, that may have been covered.

Appsecute brings a Twitter or Facebook-like timeline to devops teams so they can track bugs and what other, often geographically dispersed colleagues, are doing on a given project, ActiveState CEO Bart Copeland told me. “that nicely augments what we’re doing in private PaaS.”

With the deal ActiveState also gets three Appsecute employees — bringing its headcount to 45, presence in New Zealand to aid in its 24 X 7 support, and of course Appsecute’s IP.

Vancouver, B.C.-based ActiveState is one of several companies trying to make PaaS attractive to businesses for application deployment as well as development. Developers at risk-averse companies use these platforms to build applications, but companies often bring the finished code in house to run.

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