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Summary:

11 months after it was announced, Google Compute Engine is now available to the masses, Google Senior VP Urs Hölzle said Wednesday afternoon.

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Drum roll, please. Google Compute Engine is now available to everyone, not just those who pay $400 per month for Google Gold support. (Update: Actually, it turns out folks can sign up for GCE starting at 6 p.m. PDT on Wednesday.)

Google Compute Engine logoNotably, Google will offer its resources in sub-hour increments — something that public cloud kingpin Amazon Web Services does not support (although other providers like Cloud Sigma and Profitbricks do). Users don’t have to buy a whole hour of an instance, but can buy instances by the minute with a 10-minute minimum, Google SVP Urs Hölzle, said in a Google I/O 2013 session Wednesday afternoon.

Other perks, per Hölzle’s blog post:

  • Shared-core instances provide smaller instance shapes for low-intensity workloads.
  • Advanced Routing features help you create gateways and VPN servers that enable you to build applications spanning your local network and Google’s cloud
  • Large persistent disks support up to 10 terabytes per volume, which translates to 10X the industry standard

Hölzle also noted that Google will offer 10TB persistent disks, something an “unnamed cloud competitor” does not offer after seven years in business. As some expected, Google also announced PHP support for Google App Engine (GAE).

Google announced GCE at last year’s event in June, and started opening up access to select users a few months later. Last month, it let Google Gold customers in.

The ecosystem is getting ready too: MongoLab announced support for the Google cloud platform.

This story was updated at 1:47 p.m. PDT to update availability information. 

  1. Really interesting stuff!
    But still not safe for businesses to use…

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    1. How is it not safe. Its no more safer then any other public cloud out there. My point is that one must realize that you are running your app/code on someone else’s infrastructure.. and thus there will always be some gotchas.

      Regards
      Hareem Haque

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      1. Oh, I get it – its not as secure as a completely secure and isolated network like DOD -which nobody has ever hacked, right!

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