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Summary:

Big Blue says UrbanCode’s software works well with its own Worklight mobile application development platfrom to speed up the creation and deployment of mobile (and cloud) apps.

urbancode

If there was any doubt that devops — the practice of getting development and operations teams to work together to design and deploy software fast — is getting huge, here’s more evidence: IBM is buying UrbanCode.

ibmlogoCleveland-based UrbanCode’s software helps automate the production and delivery of new applications in a way IBM said is aligned with its own SmartCloud and Mobile First initiatives. Terms of the deal were not disclosed but the company’s 50 employees will now be part of IBM Software’s Rational group, according to IBM Software director of marketing Randy Newell.

According to IBM’s statement, UrbanCode will work nicely with IBM’s Worklight mobile application development platform:

” … by combining UrbanCode software with the IBM MobileFirst Worklight technology, businesses can now author and deploy an application for any mobile device in hours, versus a previous multi-day timeline. The UrbanCode solution also works with traditional applications including middleware, databases and business intelligence.”

Legacy IT giants like IBM are trying to find ways to strip out overhead of the development process, particularly for mobile and cloud apps, in order to better compete with leaner, nimble startups. For example, last August, BMC, which competes with IBM in systems management tools, bought Varalogix to bolster its devops story.

IBM applies devops concepts to the whole software life cycle including planning, development, testing, deployment, monitoring and feedback phases, Newell said. UrbanCode fits into the deployment piece of the cycle , while IBM’s acquisition of Greenhat in January fills in a testing check box and its buyout of Tealeaf in May 2012, figures into the feedback module.

IBM, the 100-year-old IT giant that has managed to stay relevant by changing when needed, is really focusing on cloud and mobile — and the middleware to power those efforts — to such an extent that it is reportedly thinking of selling off its server business to Lenovo.

  1. Brennan Moore Monday, April 22, 2013

    Just fyi – the 1st sentence isn’t a sentence

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    1. Thanks for catching that, we had a weird editing blip.

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  2. As a young old IBM type I think this is worth repeating and I asm sure there are some grammer errors.

    Yes, DevOps does not yet exist on Dice for one.

    At Neflix the other day I ask the difference between operations and DevOps. They said it is the same as it always was but software has become simpler and more complex. For example documentation is available to anyone, scripts are easy but the target market is moving. Netflix is not about programming, it is about math. Google, eBay, Yahoo, Datastax are not doing programming in general thus DevOps.

    DevOps at Netflix worries about failure rates of clusters due software loads and peaks. Trending loads and peaks is much more important than single failures because there is so much processing power today. Generally with Cassandra and AWS as Netflix runs one can kill a node with no worries. How often that happens and why is the problem of DevOps. In addition, not seeing it before it happens is also a problem for DevOps.

    DevOps from my view is writing scripts to analyze how the clusters are doing so bone up on your math. The software is pretty much done other than a core open source group(s). Soon most of the algorithms will be leaked and the PhD math guys will be out of work. All that will be left is DevOps and the stock holders.

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