Summary:

Klout is moving to target a slightly new audience with its latest product: businesses. Klout for Business will allow corporate customers to measure their company’s influence on social media, moving Klout away from just targeting consumers.

klout

Klout has long tried to help users understand their influence on social media networks, but on Wednesday the company has announced an addition with a new direction: Klout for business.

The company is launching a set of tools aimed at brands that want to measure social influence, and in many ways, this makes a lot of sense. While an average user might be curious about his or her reach on Twitter or Facebook, understanding this data is much more valuable to a business than a consumer, and likely something Klout will better be able to monetize.

The company explained in a blog post that it’s already begun measuring the social influence of brands through its Klout Perks program, but now it will target those businesses directly:

“Today, we are taking the data-driven intelligence we’ve developed over the years to begin a more measured march towardKlout for Business. Initially, Klout for Business will give businesses a complimentary set of analytics with pointed insights into how and where influencers are engaging with their brands in social media.

Businesses will be able to look at an easy-to-read dashboard that tells you, at-a-glance, whether you are engaging your influencers on the networks where they are most actively exerting their influence and on which Klout Score ranges you could stand to amp up your efforts. Most importantly, Klout can tell you which topics your audience influences others on, helping you maximize your content efforts to drive consideration for your brand.”

The company last tweaked the formula for its Klout scores in August 2012, and will now launch a specific page for businesses on Klout. Customers will gain access to a dashboard where they can monitor social interactions and communicate with customers.

Klout has been in business for almost five years, and it’s unclear that the company has converted average consumers — or even tech-savvy social-media addicts — into caring about their Klout scores or achieved real traction as a measuring stick for social influence. The company wrote in the blog post that it has acquired a vast amount of social data that it’s now ready to use for other purposes, but it’s possible the company has simply reached the limit of its own influence with consumers.

Klout for business

Comments have been disabled for this post