Summary:

Hashicorp was already extending Vagrant into VMware virtualized environments and now it’s adding a connection into Amazon Web Services as well. This is good news for developers.

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Development teams love Vagrant, the open-source tool that automates — and really speeds up — configuration of the virtual environments they need to build and test software.  Now Hashicorp is previewing a Vagrant plug-in for Amazon Web Services that will let developers who use Vagrant for local configuration, hook right into Amazon’s public cloud as well.

Reached by email, Hashicorp founder Mitchell Hashimoto said there is pent-up demand for this product.

“Vagrant + AWS is a big deal because it is the first time developers can use Vagrant outside of their own local machines. This unlocks capabilities never before seen with Vagrant before. This is really just the tip of the iceberg with what is possible with Vagrant 1.1, the release I’ve been working on for nearly a year now.”

Mitchell HashimotoUsed by companies including Expedia, LivingSocial, Yammer, and Mozilla,Vagrant was the brainchild of Hashimoto, who developed it in 2010 as a University of Washington student for his own projects. Last November, he launched Hashicorp to bring Vagrant — which thus far only supports Oracle VirtualBox —  to more mainstream platforms including VMware Fusion, Workstation and vSphere. That support is still on its way.
According to the web post announcing the AWS news:

“Using the same Vagrant workflow you’ve come to know and love, you will be able to launch and provision instances in EC2 or VPC, just as you would a VirtualBox machine today. Paired with local virtualization, the AWS provider can vastly improve your end-to-end workflow, unlocking use cases for Vagrant which simply didn’t exist before.”

Hashicorp is now offering a sneak peek at its AWS provider plug-in for Vagrant 1.1 which will be made available under the open-source MIT License. The actual software will be released — along with Vagrant 1.1, later this month, according to the post.

As more applications get deployed on the public cloud or in hybrid cloud environments, a tool like this one, that lets developers set up and deploy their work across boundaries, will be critical.

This story was updated at 5:51 p.m. PDT with Hashimoto’s comment.

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