Summary:

Fingerprint is moving forward in building a strong platform for educational kids games on mobile, launching a new multiplayer game that will allow kids and parents to play together on mobile, just as the parents might already do in Words with Friends or Letterpress.

FTC, children's' apps
photo: Flickr user umpcportal.com

Already enjoy playing Words with Friends or Letterpress with friends who aren’t physically nearby? How about playing with your little kids instead?

Fingerprint, the company that designs mobile educational games for kids, is translating that multiplayer game experience into a family experience with the launch of new products that aim to connect kids and parents through mobile learning.

The Flying Alphabetinis is a carnival game incorporating all 26 letters of the alphabet, and will allow parents and kids (or grandparents, friends, etc.) to play each other on different devices. The Fingerprint Play platform hosts a variety of apps built for kids (similar to Disney or Nickelodian running a slate of branded shows on its channels), and Fingerprint is launching several other news games as well on Tuesday, featuring characters from popular kids franchises like Franklin & Friends, VeggieTales, and Caillou.

Fingerprint is led by Nancy MacIntyre, a former executive at Leapfrog, who launched Fingerprint Digital in September 2011 with $1.4 million in funding. A year later, the company announced additional funding that brought the total to about $7.7 million, allowing them to expand internationally and add more games to the Fingerprint lineup. In 2013, the company plans to launch 40 new titles, including those launching this week.

The company has always focused on mobile apps for both kids and parents. Previously, the company’s games allowed parents to get notifications on their child’s progress in a game and provide in-app feedback, but the multiplayer experience will now allow them to directly play with one another on different devices.

“We like the multiplayer concept because it really involves the parents and grandparents, and because it’s asynchronous so it really gives the parents the flexibility to respond when they can,” MacIntyre said. “I think it’s important but it’s also just one aspect of the whole network that we’re building.”

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