Summary:

The tool, which synchronizes contacts, calendar entries and tasks across most platforms, is now explicitly targeting business users with the new Fruux Team version.

Fruux

Fruux’s cross-platform contact and calendar sync service makes a lot of sense for teams, what with the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend and so on, but it’s not really had proper support for that until now. But today, almost a year after the German company told us it would introduce such support to its iCloud rival, here it is.

With Fruux‘s new version, teams can jointly manage address books, calendars and to-do lists, with supported platforms including iOS, Mac OS X, Windows, Android, Linux and BlackBerry. The service also includes a team-management web interface and scheduling support – if a meeting is created in iCal, for example, team members will get requests to find out about availability.

Compared with Fruux Pro, which includes unlimited storage, contacts, calendars and tasks, Fruux Team also adds dedicated support.

There is one big gap in Fruux’s support: Microsoft Outlook. Fruux uses the open CardDAV and CalDAV protocols, and Outlook famously uses the proprietary and license-fee-bearing Exchange ActiveSync (EAS) instead.

However, after Google recently said it was dropping EAS support for Gmail on Windows Phone, Microsoft was sent scrambling for a fix, and that solution seems to include the integration of CalDAV and CardDAV support into Windows Phone.

“That’s great for us,” said Fruux CEO Dominik Tobschall, who noted that this probably meant Outlook would get CardDAV and CalDAV support sooner rather than later.

Team support is a major shift for Fruux, taking the service from a mostly personal syncing tool to one explicitly tailored for teams. Clearly aimed at business users, Fruux Team costs €4 ($5.45) per user per month.

The company is making money elsewhere, though. Tobschall told me that the service is being resold in volume by ISP partners and also being integrated as a white-label sync feature into third-party software (an example here might be a CRM application). However, he was loath to name names.

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