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Summary:

Kajeet plans to offer some kind of 4G mobile broadband service for kids, though it was a bit stingy with the details. Chances are it will start selling dongles and hotspots directly to families, turning modems into virtual nannies.

Kajeet, a mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) that serves children, has struck a deal with WiMAX carrier Clearwire to resell its 4G connections. The details of what it plans to do with that access are still fuzzy, but it looks like it plans to start selling 4G modems and hotspots to families with kids.

“Adding a 4G mobile broadband product with Clearwire gives our customers new connectivity options and allows Kajeet to expand our mobile service offerings so that we continue to lead in the creation and delivery of mobile solutions that are great for kids, families and educators,” CEO and founder Daniel Neal said in Kajeet’s announcement.

Screen Shot 2012-12-06 at 10.40.57 AMKajeet is already selling mobile broadband dongles and hotspots through its education arm, which provides schools with devices and connectivity for learning purposes. It may now be planning to bring those devices over to its consumer-facing carrier business, which for now is focused on selling feature phones, smartphones and tablets.

Backed by Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Kajeet differentiates itself from the competition by offering parental control and management software with every device. Parents can define the phone numbers allowed to call the device, restrict usage by time and track their kinds using GPS. Modems are typically open connections to the internet, but Kajeet has developed similar management software for schools called Sentinel.

While putting a 4G hotspot into a child’s hands might seem extreme, it makes more sense if you think of the device as an internet nanny rather than a modem. Children are increasingly connecting to the internet with devices through Wi-Fi: tablets, e-readers, PCc, etc. By placing its protection software on a hotspot, Kajeet can expand its parental control services to devices it doesn’t sell or directly connect.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock user Hasloo Group Production Studio

  1. do we know how successful kajeet is? and if there are the only player to target kids/teens?

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