92 Comments

Summary:

Android shopping traffic over the holiday lagged iOS even though there are more Android smartphones. We look at why Android still produces far less engagement than iOS and what might be contributing to the gap.

Android

Android has raced ahead of iOS in smartphone share but it continues to fall behind in usage and engagement in the U.S. The latest data from IBM  on Black Friday shopping traffic underscores just how much iOS outperforms Android. Asymco has some good charts that highlight the engagement gap.

IBM said that 77 percent of mobile traffic on Black Friday came from iOS devices. This despite the fact that Comscore said that Android has 52.5 percent of smartphone subscribers while iOS has 34.3 percent. Some of it comes down to the iPad, which is still the dominant tablet and produces the most traffic compared to iPhones and Android phones. But like the iPhone, the iPad exhibits outsized usage patterns beyond its actual marketshare. Gartner said in the third quarter, iPad shipments have dropped to 50.4 percent. But IBM said it contributed 88 percent of the tablet traffic over the long weekend.

Android engagement, Asymco

This is a pattern than has been in place over the last few years. But now that Android is now the top dog on smartphones marketshare-wise and is eating into the iPad’s lead thanks to the Kindle Fire, Nook and other Android tablets, why is iOS still so dominant?

Here are some theories we’ve gathered from around the web alongside our thoughts:

  • Horace Dediu of Asymco wondered if Android was attracting more late adopters, who were prone to do less with their phones than hardcore smartphone users. But he’s not convinced that’s the answer. Perhaps, it has more to do with “design considerations” or “user experience flaws or integration.”
  • One thought is that Android users are more apt to want things for free, so they’re not as likely to shop for things on their devices. We’ve seen a gap in how Android and iOS users are willing to pay for apps — Android users prefer free apps — but that difference is going down over time.
  • Some Android users are just graduating up from a feature phone and really don’t understand all they can do with their device. Considering the declining number of feature phone options, it’s possible that people are graduating to cheap Android devices, but just still talk and text on them, something Daring Fireball’s John Gruber mentioned before. 
  • Tim Windsor from Digitally Speaking goes a step further, saying that most iOS buyers are specifically buying their devices for the features they can access, while most Android users are just buying what’s available to them. Most, he believes, aren’t interested in serious computing power.
  • Jason Grisby of Cloud Four recently wrote that the gap doesn’t exist when looking at web traffic over cellular. It’s only when you examine iOS and Android traffic over Wi-Fi that a usage gap emerges. He believes that Android users might not be aware of the availability of Wi-Fi networks through their device or are in lower income brackets and have less access to Wi-Fi networks.
  • Some people believe there is no gap at the high end when looking top Android devices. The problem is with cheaper and older Android devices, which don’t provide as good an experience or are saddled with older versions of Android, which are worse at browsing. It is true there are more cheap Android phones options available, so that might contribute to some of the gap. And a majority of Android users are still on devices running Android 2.0x.
  • Apple users are more likely to use apps, which can provide a better user experience. Android users who turn to a browser may not find it as inviting or engaging.
  • It’s also possible that shopping data is not an accurate proxy for engagement. NetMarketShare earlier this year said, however, also came up with general browsing data that showed iOS devices have 65 percent of mobile traffic compared to 20 percent for Android.

To be clear, the data we’re looking at is from the U.S. only, and it’s based primarily on shopping traffic. My theory is that there are people who walk into a cellular store, see only a handful of feature phones available and a salesperson who is heavily pushing Android devices. If they want to walk out with a new phone, it’s likely going to be an Android unless they came in already looking for an iPhone. Those people may not be savvy now, but they will get more experienced over time. What are your theories on this Android paradox?

  1. Jack E Mabry Jr Monday, November 26, 2012

    As an Android user, I kind of feel that people that choose iOS know up front that there is cool stuff to do and buy from their mobile device. It started for me that way when I bought my iPod Touch a few years ago. What happened is that I got bored of just icons on a screen, talked to some IT friends that I have and bought a phone with Android, the Motorola Photon and now the Galaxy S3. I still have 2 iPod Touches and an Apple TV because I have content there but I now own 2 Google TV’s, 2 Android tablets and the GS3. I have pretty much switched my content and app buying from Apple to Google.

    Share
  2. `It’s only when you examine iOS and Android traffic over Wi-Fi that a usage gap emerges. `

    This quote is very telling for me. As an avid Android user, i never chose my Android over my notebook, but my boss, an avid iOS user, sometimes prefer to type an email on iPad even when his MacBook pro is just in front of him (literally). I cannot understand why he does that. But i see a lot of iOS users doing the same. So anecdotally, my guess would be: Android users just stick with their PCs when at home (presumably when they have Wi-Fi), whereas iOS users prefer the small screen, for some reason.

    Share
    1. I have seen exactly the same and I too wonder why they do it. My friends surf on the tiny 3.5″ screen and I almost always prefer the PC. I have core i7 PCs at home and work with 27″ screens and I’d be insane to use my relatively small 4.8″ Galaxy S3. The only time I use the phone is when I’m truly mobile.

      On my Transformer Prime, I use the desktop mode most of the time. I wonder what user agent that sends. I’d be interested in seeing whether that contributes, but I think not. I don’t think most users will know how to do that.

      Share
      1. Sounds about the same with me.

        My Verizon Nexus works great when I’m out and about – I’m grandfathered into unlimited data, 10 days in my billing cycle, I’ve used 6 GB, lots of Netflix, Youtube. At work, it’s all Windows desktops. At home, I’m on my big-screen Windows desktop, more than on my Nexus. Also, my home wifi is slower than LTE, so I don’t bother turning on wifi on my Nexus.

        I do lots of online shopping on desktops, hardly on my Nexus; I prefer the desktop big -screen for shopping. The apps I use the most are Gmail, Google Maps, and stock Android browser. I mostly use mobile websites since they work fine with me and I find apps mostly buggy, generally useless, so I hardly buy apps.

        Share
    2. People just want to showoff that they have IFAD. Isn’t that Apple’s marketing strategy all about

      Share
    3. This is exactly my thought. Even with a Google Nexus 7, I find myself reaching for my Dell XT3 tablet PC when I want to do anything that requires more than a few quick gestures. Even shopping, I can view 20 items at a time instead of 4. I only use my phone or tablet when using the notebook is inconvenient.

      Share
  3. I can’t understand (I’m lying I know exactly why) one of the most obvious scenarios hasn’t been brought up by any of the major tech media. Google something like “what’s my user agent” on an Android device. When you get to the site if you aren’t already have your broswer request the desktop site. You don’t see any hint of Android in that UA string do you? That’s because the whole point is to hide that you are mobile so that you get the desktop site.

    Has anyone questioned how sites are determining when Android devices are hitting sites? Of course not. The iFans have started coming up with any ridiculous reason they can from poor user experience to price of handsets. Meanwhile in the real world I can hardly find anyone that actually wants to do anything complex on an iPhone and hardly see them in use in public anymore.

    Share
    1. I think you’re delusional if you think most Android users even know what “user agent” means, let alone cares what it means.

      Share
      1. I doubt this. I think more android users are PC junkies who refuse to go with the iOS because of how dumbed-down it is and were pushed away from Windows mobile by MS after they gave up on the enterprise and PC geeks to go after the same market apple markets to. I have my browser set to request the desktop sites and so do my wife and all three of my kids.

        Share
    2. I see no “iFans” coming up with these reasons, these are analysts.
      I do many complex things on my iOS devices. I live in the real world. Sorry to burst your bubble of imagination

      Share
    3. Many iOS browsers allow you to change the user agent string as well. Those aren’t being counted as iOS.

      Share
    4. it still shows that you are running on android.

      Share
  4. My theory is that iOS is just that much more fun and easy to use. People gravitate toward these types of devices, and thus far Android (while powerful and certainly feature rich) is no the experience people want.

    I saw this over the long weekend here in the US. People grabbed for the iPads and iPhones… the Kindles and Android devices sat on shelves or tables as last-used devices, some collecting dust all weekend while iOS devices were actually fought for by kids and adults alike.

    I also saw laptop computers sitting idle in the mornings while iPads were out in full force as people drank their coffee and shopped sales.

    Android sells for many of the reasons already listed. It still not that awe inspiring experience that Apple provides. Only the blind Android techno geeks dont’ see this… the rest just open their eyes and it is obvious.

    Share
    1. Or it could be that iOS users force themselves to use their over priced devises to justify the premium they paid to get them.

      Share
    2. Its all yuck for me on iOS. Its so stale and static and navigation using single physical button is cumbersome and uninspiring. As far as I have seen no IFAD and I phony owners has suggested a single concrete feature that makes their experience on iOS easy.

      Share
      1. Android users are mostly bullies

        Share
  5. Has anyone considered the impact of training resources on device usage? Apple offers setup services, free workshops, and in-depth one to one and group training through its retail stores, as well as further learning opportunities via phone (AppleCare) and Internet (apple.com).

    Share
    1. Apple Stores are only available in 15 countries around the world. iOS devices are being sold at hundreds of countries.

      Share
      1. All the stats reported in this post are USA only. Apple stores have the US covered twice over.

        Share
    2. And iOS is so easy to use there is no need for anyone to learn how to use it. Seriously, even a 5 year old kid can use it.

      Share
      1. Yup, to design that kind of ux need a lot of efforts. To copy and throw everything inside is very easy.

        Share
  6. It comes down to the controversial argument of iOS vs Android. And the statistics show who’s the obvious winner. We can safely assume, with the usage statistics, that a person with both an Android and iOS device will choose the iOS device for actual use. Yes, that Android device may not be a high-end device. But the gap is so big, I believe there must be something iOS is doing right that Android isn’t.

    iOS lets users focus on their content they care about and gets everything out of the way. No widgets, no toggle switches for key settings, no this, no that. That’s sounds like a bad thing. When you actually get down to using the device, 90% of the time you are using apps. So what does the iOS Homescreen let you do? Lets you view all of your apps and launch them. Together with the overall intuitiveness and consistency of the user interface in iOS, the operating system just disappears between the user and the user’s content, letting users totally immerse in their content.

    So in the end, iOS wins on the usability segment. No matter how many features it doesn’t have, that’s what matters.

    Share
    1. Big words just based on one non-scientific results

      Share
    2. Also it seems that while many Android users claim they love android for the powerful hardware, very few of them actually even use/need that power. This just leaves them doing the same thing as iOS users, just with a slightly less clean experience + widgets.

      In the end with or without the powerful processors and graphics, they are in the same boat as any iOS user. Without a good user experience and good applications, the hardware is just excess battery drain.

      Share
      1. It seems that ifans will forever be envious of android devices and their widgets. Widgets are actually one of the reasons I went android. Was going to buy an iphone 4 at first, I just like the idea of having widgets. And yes, I do use my droid for browsing, but only if I’m not near a computer. It’s retarded to choose a small screen for browsing the net when you have a larger on right in front of you.

        Share
  7. As an Android user, I have purchased nothing other than apps from my android devices. I open my laptop when I have to. I also find it simpler to discover things I want to read on the desktop and then push hem to my tablet using Pocket. Once in pocket I can read from either phone or tablet. I take care to use the most efficient way to do stuff using a combination of devices that include my two laptops and television as well. There in lies your explanation

    Share
    1. Then that’s a failure of the OS, shouldn’t it be just as enjoyable on that device?

      Share
    2. Manfred Smellington Tuesday, November 27, 2012

      How does that explain the discrepancy? Pocket is on ios as well.

      Share
  8. Obviously, ios user had no life and stuck to their devices on black Friday. Android users?
    Went out to experience life!

    Share
    1. I doubt that! LOL!

      Share
    2. dont you mean iOS users were out and on their phone, while andriod users were on their desktops at home.

      Share
  9. Android is so screwed. Clearly Android users hate not just their devices but themselves too.

    Share
    1. Lol

      Share
    2. Thanks for your insightful contribution to the discussion.

      Share
  10. Tethering works on Android. iOS users can’t tell which apps are wasting their data like droid users can. A lot of mobile sites are really only iOS sites. (see Facebook droidfooding for example). This site also drags on every droid browser except opera. Siri results are shopping oriented. Read Woz’s comments about Siri before and after Apple.

    Personally, I use my droid for its utility. Maps, camera, SMS, music, flashlight, calculator, etc. The only time I use it for shopping is to check if I can get something significantly cheaper online.

    Share
    1. I use my iOS device the same way that you do. No problems at all. Camera, SMS (iMessage). Music (Spotify), flashlight, calculator etc. But I admit I use Google maps in the browser until a better solution appears.

      Share
      1. Spotify is easier / cooler on Android. No ‘hide’ button. Drag from off screen to access menu,. Larger screen makes all apps cooler. Capacitive ‘menu’ and ‘back’ buttons along with drag from off screen commands make the UI of any app less cluttered. The new camera menu you just hold your finger anywhere and the menu pops up in a circle around your finger. I use 2 half screen Google plus widgets, a full screen Gmail widget and NOVA launcher to customize the UX so it is exactly what I want.

        Want to experiences IOS on Android? just don’t use any cool android features.

        Share
    2. Manfred Smellington Tuesday, November 27, 2012

      Tethering works on ios too.

      Share
      1. It may, but it doesn’t matter because it costs too much. Nobody uses it.

        I have unlimited data with tethering on TMo for $30/mo. It costs $20/mo on AT&T just for the privilege of tethering alone. The data costs much more and it’s capped.

        iPhone users have budgets too. It pains me to see my friends with iphones paying extra for things I get free. I play bad piggies for free. My friend has an iphone. It will cost him a dollar.

        Share
      2. jailbreak tethering = free for ios users

        Share
  11. d

    Share
  12. I am on my 3rd iPhone. I have had Windows Phone 7, Webos, and a few different higher end android phones, most recently the Galaxy S III. I keep going back to my iPhone, BUT what i do notice, is that when i have an android phone, even a higher end android phone like the Galaxy S III, i don’t use it for anything except for calls, texts, and occasionally browsing the web. I just don’t feel compelled to use my phone as much. I feel the experience is sub par, and i tend to experience issues along the way. this is just my opinion. Whenever i have an android phone, and i need to do something dealing with the web i always say to myself “Ill just do it at home, i don’t fell like messing with it”, but i don’t have the same issue with an iPhone. I didn’t have the same exact issue with Windows Phone, but the selection of apps kept me from doing as much as I did on my iPhone. I do really enjoy the Windows Phone experience.

    Share
    1. Oh.. Mr.all feely .. Wish you had something more objective to write qualified with real experience

      Share
      1. it sounds like you’re just mad that i don’t care for android all that much. I have given Android many chances. I most recently had a Galaxy S 3, I also have had an HTC MyTouch, a Nexus S 4G, and an Evo 4g. I am not saying that they are bad phones, but every time I have owned an Android phone, I use it far less than i do when I have an iPhone, a Windows Phone, and even my webos phones.

        I guarantee i have owned more phones than you have, and am more qualified than you. I have had an iPhone 4s 3 times, the android phones listed above, an HTC HD7, Lumia 800, HTC Arrive, Lumia 710, every webos phone that was ever produced, blackberrys, and the list goes on. I will be switching to a Lumia 920 in a few months.

        Don’t attack me because you’re mad, fanboy.

        Share
  13. There’s no selection about trusting this data. It could be that the Android browsers aren’t revealing that they are actually Android. There’s absolutely no info about 3G/4G computers on the graphs, so it makes me very suspicious.

    Share
    1. Possibly, but I have seen similiar results from multiple sources over the past couple months

      Share
    2. it is possible, but i don’t think so, it is very easy to determine what browser, and operating system someone is running on by requesting a web site.

      Share
  14. I for one prefer my android over my iOS device. Only use the crapple for email. About the only thing it does well.

    Share
  15. Wouldn’t it have been more appropriate to say 2.x instead of 2.0.
    Gingerbread was much better experience than 2.1 ever was

    Share
    1. Thanks, updating the story.

      Share
  16. that’s easy… iphone users can’t afford a more pleasurable shopping experience after buying the expensive device – so they are stuck with it. the rest of us have a million other ways to buy online on a screen larger than 4″ that isn’t covered by this “study”

    Share
    1. Do you have the data to support your opinion?

      Share
    2. wow, that is a ridiculous statement.

      Share
  17. Stats on our Yammer network across the globe show 80% of mobile usage is IOS (62% iPhone, 18% ) Androd is 12% and 8% Blackberry (around 50K users) so the shopping stats are really close to an Enterprise Social Network

    Share
  18. Reminds me of Symbian… Lots of units moved, few users knew they had a smartphone or used as such. You can’t even buy a dumb feature phone now, all those users are migrating to Android. Would be interesting to know Android usage less the featurephone migrators.

    Share
  19. ” …it has more to do with “design considerations” or “user experience flaws or integration.”
    This articulates what I started to suspect just after listing and selling my Google Nexus 7 on Craig’s List (a great product, yet my third Android tablet bought and sold within 4 months of purchase). I consider myself platform agnostic. But there IS a difference between the iOS and Android user experience. I don’t see Android matching it anytime soon.

    Share
  20. My theory is based on how much people use their phones. Where I work we are not allowed to use our mobile phones, except in an emergency. In reality, if you walk around here, you will always notice at least 2 people who are using their phones. 90% of the time it will be an iPhone, not because they’re better phones but purely because the people who own them can’t keep off of them. They don’t seem to be able to go more than 20 minutes without checking FB or emails or something, but in spite of the fact that if caught, they may end up on disciplinary.
    So, In my opinion, the reason ios has higher Web traffic: obsession with mobile devices.
    Desktop browsing is far superior when looking for a lot of information.

    Share
  21. phd guy, PhDguy Tuesday, November 27, 2012

    I have seen an article on phdguy website http://www.phdguy.com about future of web and death of google.

    Share
  22. This data was collected in the US market only, proper perspective will be to consider most major markets.

    Share
  23. Nicolas Bousquet Tuesday, November 27, 2012

    When you don’t care about your phone (and many mobile phone users don’t) and just want a phone you are much more likely to be offered an Android phone than an iPhone. This is not that the low end Android phone is bad. This is just the user buy it as a phone, and so don’t use the advenced feature it doesn’t care about.

    This point is usually countered by the market share of new high end Android phone that start to show impressive number. This is true but it omit that historically most high end phone where iPhone and that many of theses devices are still arround.

    Share
  24. Just a matter of time. Android is seeing the huge push in sales because so many late adopters don’t want to follow the “i pay any price” paradigm set by Apple. So actually most Andoid users are where iOS has been roughly ~2 years back. Let’s wait the 2 years and see again …

    Share
  25. I think the question is: Why are engaged users more likely to choose iOS over Android.

    Share
    1. That question my dearest friend is complete shenanigans. A LOT of people (myself included) who like to be perpetually connected to the internet choose Android. and Simply because we have OPTIONS. unlike and iOS user who has to rely on safari with no flash to boot.

      Share
  26. i believe that android stills more better then ios as android user i think ios has lucky with the media on tvs and androids system arent like that and that sad

    Share
  27. it is really funny to see all of the android fanboys get really pissed because this is not something they want to hear. the android fanboys have become worse than the apple fanboys, and what is really bad is they are completely oblivious to it. just read some of the comments

    Share
  28. You left out one obvious one: iOS might actually be easier to use than Android and the features in question thus more “discoverable.” I know I’ve had to help out more than one relative who went to the store to buy an iPhone, got strong-armed into buying a Galaxy SIII instead, and have no idea how to make the thing work.

    Share
    1. … And those who were Dancing were called insane by those who could not hear the Music.

      Share
  29. richardfieldhouse Tuesday, November 27, 2012

    Here are two extra options:

    1) People are being put off by the actual mechanics of spending money through the fragmented choice of Android browsers. In some cases the shopping sites might not be properly tested with the browsers.

    2) The figures are just plain wrong.

    Share
    1. Not so fragmented any more. I believe > 70% of the huge android base is in 2 versions of the os. Much better nowadays.

      What I have not seen is the fragmentation in ios. The reason the older iphone are sold is for Aplle to have a lower entry price point to compete w androids and these are the older ios. (The newer os require more processing power and memory)

      Share
  30. Danny 'iPod' Chan Tuesday, November 27, 2012

    This is an interesting thought. Our company is contemplating the development of an Android version of our App and the same debate happens. Perhaps this is the reason why Android seems to have less development love than iOS…

    Share
  31. Android sales are grossly over reported.

    Share
  32. Most of my developer and “from the Internet” friends and I opt for Android. We are in our lower 20s through mid-30s, college-educated, Bay Area, progressive, mostly employed. I in my own example resonate with the second point, that Android users want free or cheap things. My friends and I ascribe to a free and open Internet culture, and are choosy about where we throw our money. Analyses that measure user “savvy” according to purchasing practices are biased in favor of consumer capitalist cultural practices.

    Share
  33. Most of my “from the Internet” friends and I opt for Android. We are in our lower 20s through mid-30s, college-educated, Bay Area, progressive, mostly employed. I in my own example resonate with the second point, that Android users want free or cheap things. My friends and I ascribe to a free and open Internet culture, and are choosy about where we throw our money. Analyses that measure user “savvy” according to purchasing practices are biased in favor of consumer capitalist cultural practices.

    Share
  34. Thank you for an interestinv read Om. Two points to make here

    I own both an iphone4 an ipad and a samsung galaxy note2 and I work in tech. iphones have the benefit of the early entrants. But this is about to change in part becahse samsung and google are actually innovating. The note2 is an iphone/ipad killer and the price point will attract an audience that can afford apple but finds a smarter value in a different form factor plus the savings/weight of one vs 2 devices.

    The second reason may be plagform specific. Apple and google bave different business models. I like the tigbt privacy settings in ios. Android does not seem to offer these in the new os and likely because the real value of free is in the advertisjng revenues. So this is like comparing aplles and oranges. The value prop for a developer is the probabiligy of having a major hit vs creating multiple revenue streams thru ads while hunting 4 tbat millikn dollar app. For me as a user I find most equivalent apps in either os -not to discount kindle marketplace or the purchases on that platform.

    Share
  35. lol at the article, err the most obvious reason is Android users prefer using desktop/laptop to shop, this article talks like desktop/laptop doesn’t even exist… desktop/laptop(with mouse) is still king when it comes to web browsing, mobile devices can’t compare

    Share
  36. My Theory.. is simple..

    More female using iOs(iPhones,iPads) then male. XD
    Someone got a statistic on how many female/male are iPhone/iPad owners?

    It´s like if you go into a shopping mall. 70% of the goods and shop´s are for females. or?

    Share
    1. I agree. All the people I know who have a Droid are guys.

      Share
  37. Its mostly to do with the fact that more than 75% of new Android users choose an Android device just because they don’t want to lag in the smartphone race. They have no real need or a fervent wish for a smartphone lifestyle.

    Here a different take on it. The truth about smart phone market shares; what the numbers don’t tell. http://mindtreeux.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/the-not-so-smart-market-shares-of-smart.html

    Share
  38. you can thank Apple for Andriod lol

    Share
  39. I hope Android folks know that while 5 yr olds can use and iProduct(which is actually a plus lol), there are also super geeks – like avid Andriod users – in the iOS market… its called Jailbreak with widgets and the whole 9 yards

    Share
  40. It largely boils down to user experience, an area where apple excels. I despise Apples way of doing business and especially resent having to use their kit but thus far I can find nothing more stable and thoughtfully crafted.

    Share
  41. I think it’s all about the Retina display! People love it :)

    Share
  42. This is really amazing statistics which clearly shows that • Low resolution and small screen where you have to squint to see what is written
    • Pathetic battery life while browsing on 3G
    • Exceedingly tough , low quality interaction for browsing .
    • If it’s a touch phone then whatever you want your touch to do will not be done but something else will happen .
    • Lagging , Jerky , inconsistent , frustrating touch response .
    • If you have a physical keypad based 3G phone then its even pathetic experience. (Ask RIM Blackberry which was leader 4 yrs ago and check out the video of Jobs presenting the iPhone 1st time). You just cannot have millions of people browsing net and use 3G to its capacity on a keypad based phone in a trouble free way. You need touch screen phones for 3G browsing Period.
    • Blackberry even 5 years from iPhone introduction has a pathetic browsing experience on its phones (and it reflects in the share price of it which has fallen 90% over last 5 years since iPhone was introduced and also its market share).

    Market share comparisons between iOS devices and android should not be done directly because every iOS device is premium while there are such low cost and cheap android phones that any comparison is wrong . The cheapest iPhone is iPhone 4. Suppose the only cheapest android was Samsung GalaxyS (both released around same time) then the comparisons would have been more matching for browser usage .

    But an iPhone 4 browsing is vastly superior to those of $200 and below android phones by any stretch of imagination .
    Most people posting here who have android would invariably have a higher end android . Hence they cannot imagine how pathetic the experience is on cheap small screen android phones and hence people use them as feature phones with camera , music and occasional email check . Thats it.

    This kind of browser share anomaly will keep remaining always until either of two things happen :
    1. apple starts to produce crap low quality iphones
    2. People compare iphones with only the top and upper mid end androids while comparing the browser market share .

    Share
  43. Like everyone here, my opinion is based on anecdotal experience… But people in my circle who are not technically savvy end up graduating to an android phone from the cheap flip phones. They have no idea of the potential on the phones. Meanwhile, my neighbor is a Mac fan (fanatic). Basically he should be paid by apple, I have watched him walk up and down the street this past weekend showing everyone whether they cared or not how he could turn on his Christmas lights using his iPhone…

    Share
    1. Tech savvy does not mean being able to remotely control any equipment with a radio device.
      DO you think iOS will allow users to make a most used app like Skype for eg. be incorporated into the default apps that come with the OS?
      Android does.
      Thats what I call Tech Savvy. Being able to use and customize your device to your needs.

      As far as graduating from cheap flip phones is concerned, feature packed is what consumers prefer. on an Android, you can have ALL the functionality of the iOS and more, all as opensource, community developed projects. why would you pay for something like that when you can get it free?

      Share
  44. Grant Walker Borden Friday, November 30, 2012

    if your jail breaking you iphone you might as well get an android. way less of a pain in the ass

    Share
  45. The other reason is, with the open source goodness of android, a lot of users are using custom ROMs (Android Operating Systems) these may or may not be based on the Android OS opensource.
    Majority of users now-a-days prefer the possibility of complete customization. An iOS on any device looks and feels the same, no individuality. that can be great for some people who like to be in a flock .
    for those who prefer making their mobile device their OWN, go for the smorgasbord of customization options available only with open source projects.
    iOS usage seems higher as there is a single thread which you could pull and get all iOS users in line.
    On the other hand, due to the diversity and customization offered by Android, it gets difficult to get an idea of the actual number of users as they may be using custom roms and browsers that you wouldn’t be able to track.
    Simple!

    Share
  46. Has anyone considered that many of us android users are real computer users? We chose android because it is not the dumbed-down OS with little customization that you get with android or windows devices. At the same time, we’re also probably a lot more comfortable using our laptop and desktop machines and we choose to use them over tiny screen devices that require touching the screen to type.

    Share
  47. “What’s your theories…” ?
    Awesome grammar.

    Share
  48. I wonder if there is a relatively greater mix of women with iPhones and men with Androids and if this contributes to the difference in shopping using a smart phone.

    Share
  49. Really simple. In app purchase was a pain for developers until 2 months ago. 2013 Xmas is when Android will overtake iOS revenue

    Share
  50. From my personal experience coming from a RAZR Maxx (which I loved) and a Nexus 7 to an iPhone 5 and and iPad 4. I’ve seen a great amount of changes in my habits. I really can’t place my fingers on exactly why But, I find that if I want to look something up or read an article the first thing I gravitate for is my iPad. The screen size is big enough to where I do not have to bring the device a couple of inches from my face. But, it is small enough to where I can fold the cover and carry it around as a notebook (a real paper notebook). What I hated about the nexus 7 was the fact that I did not find it that much bigger than the screen already on the RAZR Maxx. Sure it’s portable and small, but the amount of space was not that much MORE than what was already available on the phone itself. As a techy their really are no visible advantages of an iPhone over an Android. The only thing I can say is the experience of using the device. Things on iOS seem to be a lot smoother and crisp. The programs on Android usually feel rough around the edges and unfinished. It is true that iOS is less customizable than Android. But, if I’m trying to find directions somewhere. The advantages of having to simply slide my finger across and having the icon for Maps right there is a lot quicker than having to unlock my Android, click the app drawer, look for the app (which are always changing do to Android organizing apps in alphabetical order) and then finally open it. Another thing I love about iOS which was not available on Android is the ability to glance at your home screen and see what you have to take care of. Not only do you have the notifications in notification center or on your lock screen if you have any notifications pop up while it’s locked. But, you also get the notification badges over every single app. I don’t have to swipe down to see all I have to do. Everything is simply their at a glance. Granted some may argue that Widgets could easily fix this problem. But, most widgets either have a interval time in which they update (which if you set shorter than 15 minute intervals kills your battery) and many of them you have to physically click the refresh button either on the corner or at the bottom. Even though I love android for it’s customizable interface. I find that I am more productive between school and work with my iOS devices vs my Android devices. Another big plus I have to add is the keyboard available on both my iPhone and iPad. This is by far one of the most annoying things for me on Android. When I purchase things I like to see how they’ll help me be more efficient, faster, and productive. I feel as if the keyboards on Androids tend to be very cluttered, unorganized, and they tend to give me a clastophoic feel on the layouts. The only one that came close to pleasing me with this is the new Jelly Bean keyboard. This was do to it’s simplicity and the ability to swipe (I hate the standard SWYPE keyboard do to it being very cluttered with symbols over the letters). But, without swyping and typing away the phone really doesn’t correct the words. It’ll give me suggestions on what it thinks I meant to type. With the iPhone I can literally text a full text message without looking at the screen. Even if I don’t hit the correct keys. It is very accurate at predicting which words I meant to type and it changes them automatically. Now, if I can text without looking. This only amplifies the speed in which I can text and type while I AM looking at the screen. Another big thing is the camera on the iPhone and iPad. This goes along with the camera app itself. This goes back to simplicity. When you take a picture for example. You see the image you snapped slide into the photo album in the corner. Verifying that you took the picture. One of the problems with my RAZR was the fact that you’d take the picture. But, if the volume was off. You really couldn’t tell if the picture was taken successfully. You’d have to open the album (which was filled with glitches and choppiness) and than go back to the camera and take another picture or video. It’s basically small and very direct details such as this that make me enjoy iOS a lot more than Android.

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post