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Summary:

CIOs that try to thwart user demand for latest-and-greatest consumer technologies in the workplace could be an endangered species, according to speakers at Structure Europe. Better to accommodate and bring that new technology under IT’s big tent.

Pity the poor CIO. If he or she refuses to let employees use the hot new consumer technology they want, they’ll just use it anyway, and the CIO loses credibility and control.  But keeping up with user demands is tough.

“If the CIO stands in the way, it probably hurts the business. It’s better to try to understand what’s making people go rogue and address [their needs],” said Chris Swan, CTO of user experience for UBS.

Swan and Juergen Urbanski, VP of cloud architectures, cloud technologies and enabling platforms for T-Systems talked up the dilemma this morning at GigaOM’s Structure Europe.

Check out the rest of our Structure Europe 2012 live coverage here, and a video recording of the session follows below.

  1. Interesting thoughts here, Barb. Similarly, on a broader scale affecting CIOs, BYOD and CoIT also bring with them a whole new expectation level from end users (employees and customers alike), not just about what device type they can use at work, but about how end user applications should look, feel and perform. Most CIOs today are not prepared to effectively monitor their employees’ or customers’ experience with the applications delivered by IT. The stakes are employee productivity and job satisfaction, as well as customer satisfaction and ultimately top line revenues; a CIO can let corporate employees use whatever device they want at work, but until you get in front of the end user experience, your credibility will continue to hang in the balance.
    – John Newsom, VP/GM – Performance Monitoring, Quest Software (now part of Dell)

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