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Summary:

Apple is now asking for Judge Lucy Koh to prevent Samsung from continuing to sell seven Galaxy model phones and the Droid Charge after each were found to infringe at least one of Apple’s patents by a jury on Friday.

galaxy-s-4g-featured

Just days after winning a jury verdict over Samsung and $1.05 billion in damages for patent infringement, Apple is looking to get at least eight Samsung mobile products banned for sale in the U.S., according to a court filing on Monday. All of the Android devices Apple is targeting were found to have infringed on at least one Apple design patent, utility patent or Apple’s trade dress.

The devices at issue are:

  • Galaxy S 4G
  • Galaxy S2 AT&T
  • Galaxy S2 Skyrocket
  • Galaxy S2 T-Mobile
  • Galaxy S2 Epic 4G
  • Galaxy S Showcase
  • Droid Charge
  • Galaxy Prevail

Most of those devices on this list were found to infringe two or three Apple patents, according to the verdict reached Friday night in California. Apple’s decision to get these products pulled off of store shelves here in the U.S. looks to be a strategic move and not simply a symbolic one: all of them, with the exception of the Galaxy S 4G, are still for sale in the U.S. Before the trial, Apple successfully obtained an injunction on sales of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet and the Galaxy Nexus; though the Tab was already an out-of-date product when the injunction was placed.

There is still much more to come in this case, including the judge’s decision to allow Samsung to still sell these products. Apple can also ask for ongoing infringement damages if these offending devices remain on the market and Samsung does not obtain a license, my colleague Jeff Roberts wrote after the verdict was announced on Friday.

  1. Not a problem! We’ll just add a few physical buttons and swap out the OS. Done!

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  2. Does any one know what is the revenue coming out of the sale of these shares? I am guessing very minimal..

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  3. Typo in the last comment ..

    I meant – Phones! not shares ..

    Rewriting it again-

    Does any one know what is the contribution to revenues coming out of the sale of these phone models? I am guessing very minimal..

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  4. The “Samsung” device in that photo looks *exactly* like an iPhone 3GS. Is it any wonder Apple sued? And won big?

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  5. Michael W. Perry Monday, August 27, 2012

    Given how lazy and sloppy the jury in this case was, they might better wait until any appeals get settled. If not, they’ll end up paying Samsung for a heck of a lot of lost sales.

    But then none of this industry-wide obsession with suing makes much sense anyway.

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  6. Steve Jobs: “we have always been shameless of stealing Good Ideas” http://trenchpress.com/?p=17784

    Patents were intended to make money back on investment, and nothing more, to help better society and creativity and not to destroy it. Even LG came up with Design before Apple, but Apple patents it first then its ok? Should I or you patent the on button by pressing it or switching it?

    If one favored Apple in court but disagrees with Job’s on how Apple came to be then they are hypocrites, since that’s how apple became #1.
    If they disagree with what patents were intended for then they are again hypocrites since that helped innovation.
    If people want to live in the Stone Age then why do they have a computer or a phone?

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  7. Am I only one who thinks that banning the sale of these older devices would actually benefit Samsung? It will force people who want to buy a Samsung phone to choose from their newer phones like the S3, there by netting Samsung more profit.

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    1. I am guessing the ban will come with damage benefits. That would hurt !!!

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