Summary:

Some of the names on this year’s Technology Review list of 35 innovators under 35 are SUNY Buffalo materials chemist Sarbajit Banerjee, Lookout Mobile Security’s John Hering, as well as some familiar folks like Dropbox’s Drew Houston and Pinterest’s Ben Silbermann.

MIT dome

For those who doubt that there’s a lot of young tech talent out there, check out MIT Technology Review’s new list of 35 innovators under 35. This year’s edition includes some names you know — Dropbox’s Drew Houston, Spotify’s Daniel Ek and Pinterest’s Ben Silbermann, for example. But what’s cool is that it culls names from materials science, biotech, energy and other areas beyond the usual software- and hardware-designing suspects.

Drew Houston, Dropbox - GigaOM RoadMap 2011

Drew Houston CEO of Dropbox

New names — at least to me — include Sarbajit Banerjee, a SUNY Buffalo materials chemist who is designing windows that shield buildings from heat — except when you don’t want them to.

And there’s also Shannon Miller, co-founder and CEO of EtaGen, a startup that wants to bring new life to an old idea — a “free piston” internal combustion engine. The claimed benefit of the engine — which will generate electricity — is that it will use 25 percent less fuel than its predecessors.

Also check out 25-year-old Juan Sebastián Osorio, a former biomedical engineering student from Medellin, Colombia. He’s working on a device that monitors a premature infant’s heart rate, electrical signals from the diaphragm muscle, and blood oxygen measurements to detect problems fast.

Then there’s John Hering, who built BlueSniper technology that hijacked a Nokia smartphone from a mile away. Since then he co-founded Lookout Mobile Security five years ago to devise an app to protect Android smartphones from malicious threats and built the Mobile Threat Network to track these scourges.

But this is just scratching the surface. Check out the full list for up-and-comers in all sorts of high-tech innovation. Tech Review will host its annual Emtech Conference in October.

Feature photo courtesy of Flickr user erinc salor

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