Summary:

German startup ParStream raised a $5.6 million Series A round for its analytic database that goes head to head with larger vendors such as HP Vertica, EMC Greenplum and ParAccel. It’s a highly competitive database market right now, so we’ll see if ParStream has legs.

database table

ParStream has raised $5.6 million for its analytic database that the company claims is among the fastest and most-scalable technologies around. Khosla Ventures led the investment, with participation from Baker Capital, Crunch Fund, Data Collective, Tola Capital and a number of private investors. This is Cologne, Germany-based ParStream’s first round of funding, which should help it take on better-known competition such as Vertica, ParAccel and EMC Greenplum.

Analytic databases are all the rage in the era of big data, and ParStream appears to be saying and doing all the right things to stake a claim in the market. Companies need to know their databases can store potentially petabytes of data and that they can query that data fast — the closer to real time, the better. Here’s what ParStream claims it can do:

  • Analyze and Filter Billions of Records
  • Query Data Structures with 1000’s of columns
  • Get Answers in Milliseconds without Cubes
  • Continuously Import Data with Low Latency
  • Execute 1000’s of Concurrent Queries

However, ParStream is hardly competing against itself for customer attention. Larger vendors such as HP Vertica, EMC Greenplum and SAP (with HANA) play in the same space, as do smaller-but-proven players such as ParAccel, Actian (with Vectorwise), Calpont (with InfiniDB) and InfoBright. And there are always more newcomers, such as JustOneDB — which promises a single database for both analytics and transaction-processing — and the speed-focused MemSQL.

Generally speaking, even outside analytics, it’s a great time to be a database startup — money is flowing into NoSQL, NewSQL, cloud databases, you name it — but the competition to be one of the last products standing will also be fierce. ParStream has some good investors and, it appears, some good technology, now we’ll see if it has legs.

Feature image courtesy of Shutterstock user David Castillo Dominici.

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