4 Comments

Summary:

Here’s our daily pick of stories about Apple from around the web that you shouldn’t miss. Today’s installment: The point Apple is trying to make by suing Samsung, the Apple dividend, waning Mac battery life after Mountain Lion, and what it’s like on the Jobsset.

Stealing

With so many people writing about Apple, finding the best stories and reports isn’t easy. Here’s our daily pick of stories about the company from around the Web that you shouldn’t miss:

  • The Apple-Samsung patent infringement trial carries on, and no judgment has been issued yet. Still, TIME argues that the larger point Apple was attempting to make by suing Samsung (and others) has already been made.
  • Yesterday was the deadline to own Apple stock if you wanted to be eligible for the company’s new $2.65 dividend. Fortune reviews how traders went about procuring that stock to be in the money.
  • Ars Technica did some of its own testing, and found evidence that OS X Mountain Lion is resulting in shortened battery life for some Mac owners who’ve installed the recent OS update.
  • The latest Apple Store rumor is that Apple is “quietly” price-matching the iPhone 4 to potential buyers who mention they’ve seen a discounted device at Sprint, other carriers and retailers like Best Buy are currently offering. MacRumors has a look at what it says is an employee memo allowing for a $49 price cut in stores.
  • Gizmodo has a first-person account of what it’s like to be an extra on the set of Jobs, one of the two Steve Jobs biopic projects currently underway.

Image courtesy of Flickr user Nisha A.

  1. Michael W. Perry Thursday, August 9, 2012

    No, unless Apple’s point was to portray itself as a the world’s largest corporate jerk, this dispute is far from over. Apple hasn’t won. In the long run, it may end up a loser in the same sense that Microsoft’s long battle with the DOJ destroyed its mystique.

    The Apple-Samsung court battle will be with us for a long time. By excluding evidence favorable to Samsung on technicalities and including similar evidence from Apple, these two judges make an appeal almost certain and may even end up with a mistrial. You can’t treat a dispute this big as if it were a minor traffic violation.

    We should also keep mind what this is all about. Apple wants to ban from the U.S. market any tablet and smartphone that looks remotely like theirs. And it wants to do that despite the fact that there’s a tablet remarkable like the iPad in 2001, a 1968 movie, and despite the fact that Apple copied a Sony design for the iPhone. The result, if they are successful, with be a lot of weird looking tablets and phone with even weird UIs.

    Unfortunately, Apple executives seem intend on keeping the one aspect of Steve Jobs that they should have killed, his zeal to slander and destroy those who got in his way. Jobs had enough sense to keep that part of his persona out of public view. They don’t.

    Share
    1. Tassos Kouris Friday, August 10, 2012

      Yes you really must be reading about a different trial… I am not connected with Apple in anyway, but to see a copycat like Samsung to try to sell ridiculous stories when the truth is evident, as an artist, I find that this is violation of common sense…. If they want to be alike let them pay for it… or let them find something original… I find imitating a compliment, but copying, as an artist I have found it often and it is an insult… There is not parthenogenesis in design but cloning is bad…

      Share
    2. “Apple wants to ban from the U.S. market any smartphone that looks remotely like theirs.”

      No, I don’t agree with you. Apple wants to ban from the U.S. market any smartphone that looks *almost exactly* like theirs.

      “It wants to do that despite the fact that there’s a tablet remarkable like the iPad in 2001, a 1968 movie…”

      A 1968 movie? What did you do, spend two hours researching the distant past?

      Share
  2. Wow, Michael, you must be reading about a different trial than I am.

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post