Summary:

Here’s our daily pick of stories about Apple from around the web that you shouldn’t miss. Today’s installment: Samsung’s new CEO, Apple asks a judge to block the import of the latest Samsung Galaxy, Apple’s contribution to Google revenue, iOS’s popularity among mobile developers, and more.

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With so many people writing about Apple, finding the best stories and reports isn’t easy. Here’s our daily pick of stories about the company from around the Web that you shouldn’t miss:

  • Samsung is replacing its CEO Choi Gee-Sung with Kwon Oh-Hyun, who comes from the chips and display side of the Korean electronic giant’s business, Reuters reports. Could this signal a change in the direction of the legal dispute between the two companies? Kwon, after all, counts Apple as his biggest customer.
  • In the meantime, the animosity between the two companies continues: Apple has asked a federal judge in California to block the import of the new Samsung Galaxy S III, according to Bloomberg, because it claims the device infringes on two Apple patents.
  • Apple may be trying to lessen its products’ dependence on Google for some key features, but Google also depends on Apple, especially for its mobile revenue. Fortune reports that Apple’s iOS is likely to be responsible for about 40 percent of Google’s mobile revenue, and 2 percent of Google’s total revenue this year.
  • Where do iPhone buyers come from? According to a survey found by AppleInsider, 38 percent are moving to a new iPhone from an Android device or Blackberry, up from 29 percent a year ago.
  • It’s been six months since Google Chairman Eric Schmidt declared that mobile developers would reverse course and, in six months’ time, start choosing to develop for Android first over iOS. It hasn’t happened, and new data released by Flurry Mobile today highlights the continued popularity of iOS among developers. Two of the more interesting stats in the report: For every 10 apps built, seven are for iOS devices, the rest are for Android; and for every dollar iOS developers make through app sales, their Android counterparts make 24 cents.

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