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Summary:

Tesla investor Steve Jurvetson — a partner with Draper Fisher Jurvetson — drove off in the very first Model S electric car recently and just published this video and photo to prove it on his Flickr feed.

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Tesla investor Steve Jurvetson — a partner with Draper Fisher Jurvetson — drove off in the very first Model S electric car recently and just published this video and photo to prove it on his Flickr feed.

Jurvetson has had his eye on the first Model S since the concept of the Model S was out there. Back in 2010, Jurvetson told the story to a Chicago Tribune reporter and explained that at a board meeting in early 2009 this happened:

“The policy was that only after the car was officially on sale and the price had been set could anybody reserve a Model S. . . They were about to open the meeting, so without saying a word I whip out my wallet, where I always keep one check, fill it out for the full price of the car, and then toss it across the table. Everyone was stunned.”

Of course, the Model S is now priced at a range from $50,000 to $100,000 (expect Jurvetson’s model to be on the high end of that). Here’s the video of the delivery taken recently and posted yesterday:

  1. Congrat – Steve!
    Jantheman

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  2. Mike Kijewski Thursday, June 7, 2012

    Don’t brick it.

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  3. What good is a sustainable vehicle that the masses can’t afford. Might as well drive a Porsche.

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    1. This car is half the price of the last one. The next car will be half the price of this. Iterate until affordable.

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    2. it’s a stepping stone to get to a affordable, sustainable car. Someone has to pay for that R&D.

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    3. The base model of the Tesla Sedan has a lower total cost of ownership than a Ford Taurus. And Pat is directionally correct.

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  4. Well how nice that this guy can whip out a check for around $100K. Why not buy a $20K car like the rest of us and donate the remaining $80K to charity if you’re that rich? What happens in 7 years time when the battery is worn out? You’re up for how much to buy a new one? Still not very practical for normal people with limited money.

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    1. Buying this car makes a much larger statement than any 80,000 dollar donation. People will see it on the road and it will generate public interest in electric vehicles. In 7 years the battery will still work, but at around 80% capacity. So instead of 265 miles per charge it will go 212 miles. Of course this isn’t practical for the average man, but it is a stepping stone. As it was stated earlier, the roadster was released first at $100K, now the Model S at $50K, and the next Tesla model after the X will be priced around $30K.

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    2. Markus Roder Saturday, June 9, 2012

      Fred, your whining is disgusting.

      Yes, this man is more successful than all of us. Now you can choose if you want to emulate him or cry about it.

      Next, he bought a car that actually drives progress towards cleaner energy, better transportation and more employment for Americans. Yes, just like the first computers, mobile phones and Flat screen TVs, it is a bit more expensive than the AVERAGE American can afford – but well within reach for those who buy BMW, Mercedes, Lexus and Cadillac. Do you whine about the buyers of those vehicles, too? What do THEY do to drive development towards transportation electrification?

      Or is it just because you want EVERY electric car to be a $15,000 econobox? Well, I’ve got news for you – a decent battery for >200 mile range costs more than that. So you will find NO company selling you their product for a loss. Once again, you can cry about that or try to do better yourself.

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    3. Jeffrey Fritz Crunk Sunday, June 10, 2012

      Fred, you would have made a big splash with that comment as a steerage passenger addressing a first class passenger on one of the early trans-Atlantic passenger ships. A really big splash.

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