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Summary:

Trust-busting and 50 Shades of Grey were hot topics at last night’s annual Authors Guild Dinner where famous writers read modern-day rejection letters to Homer, F Scott Fitzgerald and others.

Roosevelt

Trust-busting and 50 Shades of Grey were hot topics at last night’s annual Authors Guild Dinner where famous writers read modern-day rejection letters to Homer, F Scott Fitzgerald and others.

New Yorker stalwart Calvin Trillin presided over the midtown Manhattan event which commemorated the Guild‘s 100th anniversary of standing up for the country’s writers. The group’s opponents have changed significantly in recent years.

“I never guessed that among our antagonists would be the US Department of Justice,” said Guild president Scott Turow in a broadside against the government’s decision to sue publishers and Apple over price-fixing. Turow also suggested the Guild’s founding vice-president, President Theodore Roosevelt, would today have taken action against the growing dominance of Amazon. The online retailer has lately become a bete noire for many literary types.

A number of the evening’s speakers, who also included writers David Rakoff and Sarah Jones, made obligatory digs at 50 Shades of Grey, an erotic work derived from Twilight fan fiction and derided as “mommy porn” that has inexplicably topped the New York Times bestseller list.

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  1. Karen Kazaryan Tuesday, June 5, 2012

    Teddy Roosevelt would recognize instantly that people like of Scott Turow don’t represent actual authors, but a legacy cartel

  2. “…inexplicably topped the New York Times bestseller list.” Oh, silly me. I thought it got there because millions of readers bought it.

    Perhaps Scott Turow and his sycophants should just tell the American people what they can read, since clearly, on our own, we are incapable of making a proper bestseller.

    1. I think the inexplicable part is because it’s apparently terrible. Many of my friends have read it (I haven’t) and said stuff like “the writing was horrible… but I couldn’t put it down”.

      1. Yeah, I got what they meant by “inexplicable,” it was clear they found it unworthy. My point was that it’s the readers who decide what is worthy of being a bestseller, not the Authors Guild.

  3. Scott or Teddy may know something I don’t as I had no idea realize the DOJ has filed suit against the Authors Guild. You know, the organization that is supposed to rep authors?

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