Summary:

Here’s our daily pick of stories about Apple from around the web that you shouldn’t miss. Today’s installment: Steve Jobs’ first idea for the iMac’s name, the latest security update for Macs, and Intel’s plan to get into Apple’s mobile devices.

iMac 1998

An ad for the original iMac.

With so many people writing about Apple, finding the best stories and reports isn’t easy. Here’s our daily pick of stories about the company from around the web that you shouldn’t miss:

  • MacMan? Really, Steve? Ars Technica reviews former adman Ken Segall’s book Insanely Simple. Segall knew Steve Jobs back when his agency, TBWAChiat/Day worked with Apple, and in the book he talks about Jobs’ terrible track record during the first attempt to name new products.
  • ComputerWorld breaks down the list of new security measures packed into Apple’s latest Mac OS X update.
  • Why is it suddenly in vogue for financial analysts to wonder aloud whether the iPhone is hurting more than helping carriers who sell it, especially in the face of evidence to the contrary? Fortune traces the claim’s rise.
  • Proview — who claims that it and not Apple owns the trademark on iPad in China — was nonplussed by Apple’s settlement offer of $16 million. The Next Web translates a report from China’s Beijing Times that says Proview is holding out for $400 million.
  • Longtime partner for the Mac, Intel has famously — and embarrassingly — been shut out of Apple’s mobile device juggernaut. Forbes has the latest plans from the chipmaker to get Apple’s attention for its mobile chips.

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